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 Post subject: A question
PostPosted: Mon Nov 04, 2013 6:14 am 
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Kitchens Planning Manchester
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Hi all. I have a question for people who have breastfed. It's something that has been bothering me at work and I'm confused as to what I think about it.
All of the managers here have a duty principal rota where we have to stay at work until 9pm and be the person responsible for the building. We each only
have to do it 3 or 4 times per year and you can take back the time so it's no big deal, or even start later that same day if you want to. You can swap them if you can't do that evening. But a woman has demanded being taken off the rota because she is breast feeding. She is back at work full time as far as I know, maybe she's cut her hours just slightly. I don't know what
the conversation entailed, I wasn't party to the discussions, but it was allowed, so a couple of people have to pick up an extra evening. It all means absolutely nothing in the scheme of things and people aren't complaining that she was given the time off the rota. It just really intrigues me. Does this mean she never goes out in the evenings? We do not have a crèche here so her baby must be somewhere else during the day and must somehow be fed. Is it some kind of ruse to get out of evenings or is there some genuine reason? I want to give breastfeeding mothers every bit of support I can but it seems as though I'm missing something.

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 Post subject: Re: A question
PostPosted: Mon Nov 04, 2013 8:07 am 
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***LIES!!!***
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how old is the baby? Most working breatfeeding moms pump milk during the day and the baby is fed pumped milk in a bottle or cup while the mom is working. Babies still need practice breastfeeding, though, and a very young baby who primarily bottle feeds may lose interest in or lose the skill of breastfeeding, so it is important for moms and babies to be together as much as possible in the infant stage. It's also important for milk supply, since the baby sucking more effectivelt drains the breast and stimulates greater production. It is very common for moms of young infants, especially the breastfeeding ones, to not leave their babies unless they really have to. I definitely had very, very few social engagements before mine was 6 months. However, if the time is flexible I do think there is some point where it becomes reasonable to work the occasional weird hour, but it really just depends on her baby


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 Post subject: Re: A question
PostPosted: Mon Nov 04, 2013 9:16 am 
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one thing i've learned about BF is that everybody seems to do it differently, and everyone has such wildly different experiences. She could be some mom who has been fighting and fighting to produce enough milk for the baby and she fears that any change to the routine might jeopardize it. The kid may not be fed breastmilk during the day or maybe that just-home-from-work feeding is the most important one (maybe the only one?).
I do know that when my kids were young enough to be BF I was just barely holding my shiitake together (pumping every few hours for one baby while nursing the otherm and I was totally exhausted) and one single tweak would have sent my whole house of cards tumbling down, so I'm biased.
Or, the woman might be using it as an excuse. I guess what matters is that it's been approved, and you just can't know unless you know the situation.

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 Post subject: Re: A question
PostPosted: Mon Nov 04, 2013 9:53 am 
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There could be a myriad of reasons behind why she does not want to work until 9pm. Just thinking from my own personal situation, I nurse my daughter to sleep. It's part of her routine, it's become "our time" just for her and me and I don't compromise on that. She goes to bed around 8ish so working to 9 would be an impossibility for me. Plus it sounds like she's just returning to work and her child is still young, like torque said that might just be too much for her right now. On the other hand, she could just be using it as an excuse too. You never really know. What's important is that she is working in a supportive environment that gives her the flexibility to do what she feels is best for her family. Eventually I'm sure she'll start picking up the hours again and working that later shift. And to be honest, she might not go out in the evenings, especially with a young child at home. My child is almost 2 and I still rarely out in the evenings. I'm too tired to do so!

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 Post subject: Re: A question
PostPosted: Mon Nov 04, 2013 10:01 am 
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Making Threats to Punks Again
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Yes to the above.

Personally, I need to breastfeed my younger daughter to sleep at night. If I want to go out, I have to go out late-- after she's in bed. During the day though, she will nap without the boob.


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 Post subject: Re: A question
PostPosted: Mon Nov 04, 2013 10:47 am 
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Kitchens Planning Manchester
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Thanks all. She's been back at work full time for at least 8 months and will have had a good (UK) maternity leave, so the baby isn't very young, but the going to sleep thing makes complete sense. I thought there must be something to it that I wouldn't have thought of.

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 Post subject: Re: A question
PostPosted: Mon Nov 04, 2013 2:26 pm 
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***LIES!!!***
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Ah. With a baby that old (toddler perhaps now?), the sleep time thing makes the most sense. If she is still struggling with supply and kid-knowing-how-to-breastfeed issues at this point, I feel for her.

I was back to working in the evenings at 6 weeks post partum, but really, if I didn't have to do it, I certainly wouldn't have volunteered. It's not like such things are impossible, and lots of people do it, but they are a serious pain in the asparagus.


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 Post subject: Re: A question
PostPosted: Mon Nov 04, 2013 9:00 pm 
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Just as an example, my kid is just about 2 and breastfed. I wouldn't even consider working until 9 unless I was desperate. My son still nurses to sleep and goes to bed at 8. I think that it is pretty common of an occurrence for breastfed babies. Working past his bedtime and messing that up for even just a random shift would seriously mess up our sleep.


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 Post subject: Re: A question
PostPosted: Mon Nov 04, 2013 9:04 pm 
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Semen Strong
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tank wrote:
Just as an example, my kid is just about 2 and breastfed. I wouldn't even consider working until 9 unless I was desperate. My son still nurses to sleep and goes to bed at 8. I think that it is pretty common of an occurrence for breastfed babies. Working past his bedtime and messing that up for even just a random shift would seriously mess up our sleep.


This is exactly our situation as well.

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