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 Post subject: Re: japanese food
PostPosted: Thu Apr 12, 2012 3:22 pm 
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Drunk Dialed Ian MacKaye
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torque wrote:
adam, it's super easy to make.......

Do you have a recipe? I've only used the curried udon recipe from VCON, but I'm always up for more curry recipes.

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 Post subject: Re: japanese food
PostPosted: Thu Apr 12, 2012 3:39 pm 
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i don't use a recipe (and have described my methods here i think, a search might turn up something) but this guy's methods are almost exactly the same as mine EXCEPT no meat, obvs, and i use a mixed curry powder and don't add worcestershire sauce.
http://norecipes.com/blog/karei-raisu-j ... urry-rice/

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 Post subject: Re: japanese food
PostPosted: Thu Apr 12, 2012 5:26 pm 
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Location: In some dumb hotel in an equally dumb town...or in San Diego
its pretty much making a roux with curry spices added if memory recalls

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 Post subject: Re: japanese food
PostPosted: Thu Apr 12, 2012 8:02 pm 
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Drunk Dialed Ian MacKaye
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Okay, so it's just that pretty basic recipe then? I totally already make that, memorized and everything. Thanks, guys!

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 Post subject: Re: japanese food
PostPosted: Fri Apr 13, 2012 1:45 am 
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My local paper just ran an article on making your own miso! I never even had considered it. You need your beans (soy, chickpea, or something else), salt, and koji starter. Plus time and a bit of patience.

LINK: http://www.newsreview.com/chico/alive-w ... id=5699936

After I make my own no-palm-oil buttah, I think I'm going to give this a try.


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 Post subject: Re: japanese food
PostPosted: Fri Apr 13, 2012 6:17 am 
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Seagull of the PPK
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one of these days i am going to write up the novel that is "how to make your own miso koji when you live in a land with no miso koji". this is how they used to do it back in the day in japan too, supposedly, it comes from my grandmother-in-law who was fresh off the boat here. it is a huge, stinky and chancy process involving long grass, tablecloths, cornmeal/rice and lots of praying that the right kind of yeasts fall in your yard instead of the wrong kind. but i've never had luck with using miso from an old batch as the starter, only using the wild koji (and the tastes vary depending on what strains of yeast you have- here miso has a very distinct taste)

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 Post subject: Re: japanese food
PostPosted: Fri Apr 13, 2012 7:48 am 
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Kale Wreath
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torque wrote:
this guy's methods are almost exactly the same as mine EXCEPT no meat, obvs, and i use a mixed curry powder and don't add worcestershire sauce.
http://norecipes.com/blog/karei-raisu-j ... urry-rice/

I tried this recipe once, but I found it kind of bland actually. I kept adding things to try to make it more flavourful, but it didn't really work.

Does anyone have any suggestions on what to do with fresh wakame? I received a giant (I mean giant) bag of it as a gift, but other than adding to miso soup or udon, I'm not sure what to do with it.

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 Post subject: Re: japanese food
PostPosted: Fri Apr 13, 2012 8:44 am 
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pistachiorose wrote:
Does anyone have any suggestions on what to do with fresh wakame? I received a giant (I mean giant) bag of it as a gift, but other than adding to miso soup or udon, I'm not sure what to do with it.


How about cucumber wakame salad? I've never actually had it, but just happened to see it on a menu yesterday in a dumpling restaurant.

This is the 1st recipe that comes up on google: http://japanesefood.about.com/od/salad/ ... esalad.htm

Apparently it is a sunomono. (I know very little about japanese food - I just read that)

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 Post subject: Re: japanese food
PostPosted: Fri Apr 13, 2012 11:17 am 
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torque wrote:
one of these days i am going to write up the novel that is "how to make your own miso koji when you live in a land with no miso koji". this is how they used to do it back in the day in japan too, supposedly, it comes from my grandmother-in-law who was fresh off the boat here. it is a huge, stinky and chancy process involving long grass, tablecloths, cornmeal/rice and lots of praying that the right kind of yeasts fall in your yard instead of the wrong kind. but i've never had luck with using miso from an old batch as the starter, only using the wild koji (and the tastes vary depending on what strains of yeast you have- here miso has a very distinct taste)


I would love to read that novel.

I made my own bread starter from wild yeasts many years ago, but that seems a distinctly more forgiving process than you describe here!


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 Post subject: Re: japanese food
PostPosted: Fri Apr 13, 2012 4:14 pm 
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Seagull of the PPK
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pistachiorose wrote:
I tried this recipe once, but I found it kind of bland actually.

Does anyone have any suggestions on what to do with fresh wakame? I received a giant (I mean giant) bag of it as a gift, but other than adding to miso soup or udon, I'm not sure what to do with it.

def cucumber wakame salad!! (i think that's about all you can do with it besides freeze).
and if it's fresh you probably need to soak the shiitake out of it, is it salted?

another thing we make is konbu jelly, like to eat along with your rice, in theory i don't see why you couldn't make it with half konbu half wakame, or even more. i am not finding a recipe like mine but if you look for recipes for kombu tsukudani you will see another option- my jam is like tsukudani just with a bit more sugar and cook the shiitake out of the kombu til it gets like jelly til it's a paste. obviously use whatever flavor adder you like that's not little fishies.

As for curry man- he's getting all his flavor from the meat. to make up for it, i usually throw in a bit of kombu and some mushrooms when i put the water in, and definitely use a boullion cube or two in the water. on occasion i will put in worcestershire or ketchup or even marmite (don't tell!) when i feel it's lacking something.

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 Post subject: Re: japanese food
PostPosted: Sat Apr 14, 2012 4:14 am 
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I like to make okonomiyaki, which is fun and versatile... I got the recipe from one of the old Moosewood cookbooks and veganized it. So yeah, not authentic, but most of the recipes I've come across are basically the same. Get yourself some mirin to put in the batter. Yum.


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 Post subject: Re: japanese food
PostPosted: Mon Apr 16, 2012 2:27 pm 
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mmm I got some lovely looking soba noodles at a Japanese market recently because basically I miss the greasy unauthentic yakisoba I used to get at those Dojo restaurants here in NYC. I realize it's just sorta a stirfry with noodles added but does anyone have tips or recommendations to make a nice yakisoba?


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 Post subject: Re: japanese food
PostPosted: Tue Apr 17, 2012 8:21 am 
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Audrey-- hate to tell you, but good yakisoba is not made with soba noodles. use them for zaru soba or wanko soba or something warm and soupy or cold and dippy.
yakisoba is made with yellowish noodles (sometimes egg sometimes not)- they're the leftover noodles from the ramen shop, if i can believe my cooking teacher. because i can't get them without egg, i prefer to use udon and make yakiudon instead, or even just spaghetti. don't waste good soba on yakisoba!

and the key to japanese yakisoba is worcestershire sauce, but it's like any other ethnicity- ask three cooks and you'll get 4 recipes.
i hate to say it but mark bittman seems to do it my way....
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/03/dinin ... ref=dining
though he sort of waffles on the sauce
this blog shows okinawa style yakisoba, and is meat city (apologies in advance) but they talk about the sauce using worcestershire and ketchup and soy, which is usually how i roll. and the process photos are good.
http://mickmc.tripod.com/yakisoba.html

sorry it took me a while, i am working on a tight deadline this week and trying to stay away from PPK.

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 Post subject: Re: japanese food
PostPosted: Tue Apr 17, 2012 11:32 am 
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Huffs Nooch
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torque wrote:
Audrey-- hate to tell you, but good yakisoba is not made with soba noodles. use them for zaru soba or wanko soba or something warm and soupy or cold and dippy.

I've been trying to remember what zarusoba was called! I ate this at so many sobaya when I visited Japan; I was 16 at the time so my memory has been a bit fuzzy. I just picked up some green tea soba noodles, so this is on the menu this week.


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 Post subject: Re: japanese food
PostPosted: Tue Oct 16, 2012 8:31 pm 
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I'm resurrecting this thread because believe it or not 6 months later I still haven't used my new rice molds haha.

I am still trying to figure out something my toddler would like, and he's gotten even pickier than 6 months ago. I finally got the right type of japanese sushi rice from a local asian grocery a week or two ago, along with some shiso furikake.

Then, since he loves sweet stuff (and rice), I hatched an idea the other day and bought a can of aduki beans. I figure I could mash them and sweeten with some agave for a type of red bean paste to put in the middle of the onigiri.

The thing is, as much as I love the daifuku I've bought premade before, I know nothing about red bean paste.

Do people who are more knowledgeable about Japanese food think this could be a good idea? Wikipedia seems to be telling me red bean paste is not traditionally put into onigiri, so maybe I'm on the wrong track.

Any advice would be appreciated, I really don't want to waste all these good ingredients.

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 Post subject: Re: japanese food
PostPosted: Tue Oct 16, 2012 9:53 pm 
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Drunk Dialed Ian MacKaye
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Onigiri (rice balls) normally have a savoury filling. But really, you don't have to be authentic. Just because it's not traditional doesn't mean it won't work. Red bean paste would probably taste pretty delicious in a rice ball. You could also go the fusion route, and try a meatball for a filling - like a sweet and sour one (there's one in Chloe's Kitchen if you happen to have that).

Also, if you have glutinous rice flour/mochiko, you can make daifuku in the microwave. I've done it before, and it was easy and fun.

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 Post subject: Re: japanese food
PostPosted: Tue Oct 16, 2012 10:11 pm 
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Sweet and sour meatball in an onigiri would be insanely awesome!

I've also had Japa-tex onigiri stuffed with black beans, spinach, "cheese" and mexican spices - it was super yum.


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 Post subject: Re: japanese food
PostPosted: Tue Oct 16, 2012 10:14 pm 
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I am not great at making japanese food, but my partner *loves* it, and is good at it. The book Kansha (all vegan and vegetarian) and Miyoko Schinner's "Contempory and Traditional Japanese Cuisine" (name?) is also fantastic - they bridge the gap between each other.


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 Post subject: Re: japanese food
PostPosted: Tue Oct 16, 2012 11:50 pm 
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Drunk Dialed Ian MacKaye
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Oooooooh, yes! Kansha is absolutely stunning! Such a beautiful book, and the recipes in it are awesome!

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 Post subject: Re: japanese food
PostPosted: Wed Oct 17, 2012 3:35 am 
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I can also recommend the Japanese recipes in Asian Vegan Kitchen.

There are really great basic recipes for homestyle Japanese cooking in there which are a good starting point to get used to the techniques! I LOVED the negi-jaga, the stewed squash, both kinpira recipes and in the Chinese section is a recipe for Mapo-tofu that was very Japanese-style.


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 Post subject: Re: japanese food
PostPosted: Wed Oct 17, 2012 5:58 am 
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I made a huge response to this last night and lost my connection!! Booo.

@aubade- sure, anko (red bean paste) in a rice ball is not traditional, but anyone with a kid knows you got to do what you can. So why not? i have a recipe but i'm sure Maki on Just Hungry has one that's probably easier and better. I am not sure i would use agave, as the sugar makes the beans thicken, like in making jam. You could try. You do want to make sure that your filling is not wet, as it will make your onigiri fall apart.
We are pretty traditional at home but i have had some onigiri with weird things inside- chickpea salad, chopped cucumbers mixed with sriracha, oh god chopped dill or bread and butter pickles!!!, mango chutney..... again, make sure it's dry, pat things dry or strain them. if stuff like chopped cukes is inside you need to eat it immediately so it doesn't fall apart.

You might also want to try sekihan, which is the traditional japanese rice-and-beans. you can eat it in a bowl or make onigiri out of it. it's pretty easy. Maki's recipe is http://justhungry.com/2006/03/japanese_basics.html ; i use a mix of half mochi rice and half normal rice, as for me 100% mochi rice is crazy sticky. Roll it in gomashio or sesame seeds- for some reason we always use black sesame seeds around here, it looks cool.

ALSO- instead of making the bean paste for an experiment that he may not like anyway, most asian stores do sell bean paste in cans (see characters and different cultural permutations here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_bean_paste ); alternatively, there is a bean paste candy called youkan that is like a bar of candy made from bean paste, agar, and sugar. you could cut off a piece and put it inside the onigiri (they often sell small bars of these and it might be the least risky investment in your time and money!) Check ingredients (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yokan) as sometimes the tea flavored ones have almost no beans in them, which sort of defeats your purpose.

I just got about 4kg of azuki from my uncle this weekend and my daughter is begging me to make anko and youkan- i like her to eat it as it is beans, even if there's sugar in there, and she loves this stuff. yay cultural heritage (woohoo).....

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 Post subject: Re: japanese food
PostPosted: Wed Oct 17, 2012 6:14 am 
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This thread has reminded me to revisit Kansha again! I look at it all the time, but can never decide what to make.

Oh, red bean paste. I remember biting into what felt like everything in Japan and there it was, red bean paste. Again. If onigiri with the paste isn't authentic, then it is definitely some solid Japanese-inspired food.


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 Post subject: Re: japanese food
PostPosted: Wed Oct 17, 2012 6:25 am 
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^^ hehe, for someone who doesn't like anko, Japan is like a minefield. That ain't chocolate ice cream......

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 Post subject: Re: japanese food
PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2012 5:20 pm 
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These are all great ideas, thanks so much! Now I just need the time to create something. I will post back when I do.

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 Post subject: Re: japanese food
PostPosted: Sat Oct 20, 2012 3:27 pm 
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just to pipe in - no, it isn't traditional, but it'd be pretty close to ohagi. so go for it! :) sounds like something i would do. when i was in japan for weeks at a time, i use to make a dish of rice, peanut butter, seaweed flakes, and furikake. maybe with a dash of tamari. i know it sounds odd, but it tasted great. i'm with torque - put whatever you want in the onigiri!

quick search found me this about ohagi: http://www.delectablehodgepodge.com/recipes/ohagi.html

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