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 Post subject: Family Holiday Food Traditions
PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 8:04 am 
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My mom always sent out dozens of a Swedish cardamon bread every holiday. (This started before the era of the KitchenAid mixer so she kneaded that by hand!)

What food traditions do you observe in the December holidays?

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 Post subject: Re: Family Holiday Food Traditions
PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 8:15 am 
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Tamale making! I'm not making any this year as I'm visiting my family later than usual but I made plenty last year. We used to make hundreds of tamales every year around Christmas time but it is much less these days.

Also my mom bakes cookies and candies for the entire family as gifts. They are vegan these days and the family never noticed the switch. I'll be in time to help her with some of them but generally every surface seems covered with cookies when you visit around Christmas time.

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 Post subject: Re: Family Holiday Food Traditions
PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 9:30 am 
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cookies for my favorite clients!!! And the kid's teachers. It's a huge list this year and I actually will do some baking this afternoon (it's the last week of school, so I need to get my shiitake together).

also, we make Christmas Baskets for our employees. It's a tradition here, where you usually buy a readymade one, (usually, ironically, in a box); among other things, it contains olive oil, candy, dried fruit, champagne, nuts, panettone, and maybe some sardines [thanks Portugal for this bizarre holiday tradition]. Instead of buying crappy, expensive ready-made baskets, I make the baskets myself with things I think the employees really would like, and our money goes farther. This year's basket is pretty awesome, if I may say so myself.

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 Post subject: Re: Family Holiday Food Traditions
PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 9:48 am 
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Post pictures Torque (if you can)! Those sound great!

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 Post subject: Re: Family Holiday Food Traditions
PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 9:52 am 
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My mum makes this dish for breakfast called "wife-saver" that should probably challenge my feminism, but it's my mum and she likes it. And it is quite disgusting, as it contains ham, rice crispies, eggs, cheese, and more. Adorably (but unfortunately), she makes a vegan version for me with Daiya and egg replacer, and I choke it down appreciatively.

This is my first December holidays with just me and my boyfriend, so I'm excited to start our own little traditions. I think I want to have an Indian feast for Christmas dinner.


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 Post subject: Re: Family Holiday Food Traditions
PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 10:33 am 
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the best one is our almost vegan christmas eve dinner. Ukrainian christmas eve dinner is traditionally meatless and since my family's from a landlocked area, there's no fish to muck things up. So, we make dozens of vegan pirogi, stuffed cabbage, borscht with mini mushroom pirogi in it, and the only non-vegan stuff is a nasty honey-wheat-poppy-walnut concoction called kutya and a dish of onions my dad insists in sauteing in butter. it's pretty awesome (and starchy!).


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 Post subject: Re: Family Holiday Food Traditions
PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 10:34 am 
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aiee wrote:
the best one is our almost vegan christmas eve dinner. Ukrainian christmas eve dinner is traditionally meatless and since my family's from a landlocked area, there's no fish to muck things up. So, we make dozens of vegan pirogi, stuffed cabbage, borscht with mini mushroom pirogi in it, and the only non-vegan stuff is a nasty honey-wheat-poppy-walnut concoction called kutya and a dish of onions my dad insists in sauteing in butter. it's pretty awesome (and starchy!).

My boyfriend's parents made kutya with agave. It was delicious!


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 Post subject: Re: Family Holiday Food Traditions
PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 10:54 am 
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My family's latke recipe uses grated potatoes instead of shredded (it produces a potato mush rather than shreds). No food processors allowed. Mom scolds all the graters to go faster because the potatoes are turning black. And there's always a bit of knuckle and blood lost to the grater.

If there are (non-Jewish) guests, they watch in horror as my mother dumps loads and loads of oil into the frying pan.


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 Post subject: Re: Family Holiday Food Traditions
PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 1:15 pm 
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mollyjade wrote:
My family's latke recipe uses grated potatoes instead of shredded (it produces a potato mush rather than shreds). No food processors allowed. Mom scolds all the graters to go faster because the potatoes are turning black. And there's always a bit of knuckle and blood lost to the grater.

If there are (non-Jewish) guests, they watch in horror as my mother dumps loads and loads of oil into the frying pan.


you read my mind ;)

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 Post subject: Re: Family Holiday Food Traditions
PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 1:22 pm 
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I don't really have family or celebrate the holidays, but I do like to spend the couple of days I have off work cooking and spending time with my fiance at home. Last year we did tamales, and it was fun! He really liked doing it too, so that might become our tradition.

If I go to my siblings for the holidays, I will always bake something. They are usually suspicous of vegan food, but last year I actually impressed them with the Mexican Hot Chocolate Snickerdoodles (the recipe is on the PPK blog). I also like to take cookies to my dentists office (ironic I know). They work really long hours in December, so I like to do something for them. I would bring baked stuff to work, but nobody really talks or anything...I hardly know anyone by name.


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 Post subject: Re: Family Holiday Food Traditions
PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 1:22 pm 
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vijita wrote:

This is my first December holidays with just me and my boyfriend, so I'm excited to start our own little traditions. I think I want to have an Indian feast for Christmas dinner.

We did that one year and it was the best Christmas ever!

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 Post subject: Re: Family Holiday Food Traditions
PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 1:47 pm 
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vijita wrote:
My mum makes this dish for breakfast called "wife-saver" that should probably challenge my feminism, but it's my mum and she likes it. And it is quite disgusting, as it contains ham, rice crispies, eggs, cheese, and more. Adorably (but unfortunately), she makes a vegan version for me with Daiya and egg replacer, and I choke it down appreciatively.

This is my first December holidays with just me and my boyfriend, so I'm excited to start our own little traditions. I think I want to have an Indian feast for Christmas dinner.


Ha ha, wife saver sounds pretty gross, but it's super cute that your mom makes you a vegan version.

Also, Indian Xmas dinner sounds awesome!

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 Post subject: Re: Family Holiday Food Traditions
PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 1:48 pm 
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aiee wrote:
the best one is our almost vegan christmas eve dinner. Ukrainian christmas eve dinner is traditionally meatless and since my family's from a landlocked area, there's no fish to muck things up. So, we make dozens of vegan pirogi, stuffed cabbage, borscht with mini mushroom pirogi in it, and the only non-vegan stuff is a nasty honey-wheat-poppy-walnut concoction called kutya and a dish of onions my dad insists in sauteing in butter. it's pretty awesome (and starchy!).


Tell me more! I want to learn about meatless ukranian recipes!

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 Post subject: Re: Family Holiday Food Traditions
PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 1:50 pm 
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I guess my favorite tradition is that on Xmas morning we go my parents house and have waffles with them. I love it!

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 Post subject: Re: Family Holiday Food Traditions
PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 2:55 pm 
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We always have Swedish meatballs (köttbular) and lingonberries on Christmas! (Traditionally we would have lutfisk but even all the non-vegans are pretty much over that at this point.) And we do cardamom bread too! For Christmas day brunch we do Swedish pancakes and pea soup. I'm still working on a perfect vegan version of my mom's pannkakor recipe.

My mom also makes cookies and toffee for gifts every Christmas. She even makes vegan versions of toffee, pepparkakor and pecan shortbread cookies (like a Mexican wedding cookie but apparently Swedish?). This year I'm doing mazarines as well.


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 Post subject: Re: Family Holiday Food Traditions
PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 3:34 pm 
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ameyfm wrote:
Tell me more! I want to learn about meatless ukranian recipes!


Since all of my grandparents on the ukrainian side of my family have died, I've relied pretty heavily on the Ukrainian Daughters' Cookbook (http://www.ukrainiangiftshop.com/Ukrain ... info/BC02/) since no one every wrote down any recipes and my grandparents were more expert canners/preservers than expert cooks anyway. The cookbook includes all of the xmas eve menu items I mentioned (not all vegan, but they're pretty easy to veganize). You should proceed with some caution and common sense with the book, some of the recipes call for insane amounts of oil/mayo and/or make ridiculous quantities for church picnics. There are also tons of gross meaty recipes in there as ukrainian food in general is not the most vegan-friendly (though lent/holy day recipes and menus will often be vegan and googling for those will get you some interesting ideas).

For pirogi, I follow the recipe in the book (and probably every basic recipe on the internet) pretty closely, but I use about 1/3 cup plain mashed potato in place of each egg usually needed in the dough (you'll have the potatoes on hand for filling already), or you can use potato cooking water in place of water and leave out the eggs to get the same result. There's a lot of talk of including cheese in potato pirogi on the internet, but that's not something my family ever did. Plain potato & onion is great. We also sometimes use sauerkraut as a filling. Mushroom filling is just finely chopped mushrooms sauteed with onion and s&p until they're browned and the juices have evaporated. Anyway, pirogi are totally simple, just a big production.

To serve just-made pirogi, you serve them right after boiling with a dish of sauteed onions for topping. Leftovers you fry up with onions. I tend to use olive oil as my fat for cooking onions and frying pirogi even though earth balance would probably be the more appropriate choice. I like how it turns out, but you might want to use eb or a more neutral oil for authenticity.

The best use for mushroom pirogi are to make minis to float in borscht, they're so, so good together, and it's such a special treat. Borscht is something I usually just wing - if you're using onions, beets, cabbage, carrots, potatoes and dill, you'll probably wind up in the right place. This recipe from serious eats is reasonably close to what my family makes, but you should add a potato or two and garnish with dill rather than parsley: http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2009 ... ecipe.html There are a lot of borscht recipes that use tomato soup, but that's gross (a little tomato paste or juice in place of some of the stock is ok).

The stuffed cabbage is rice-based, usually with mushrooms & onion added to the rice, and cooked layered with a plain tomato sauce. I've honestly never made holopchi by myself, that's my dad's department.

Finally, this isn't something we make for xmas eve, but poppy bread is another classic ukrainian food. I've successfully veganized it by using vegandad's babka dough recommended for his chocolate babka (I would up the flour just a bit next time as my last batch was a little too cakey and soft, and I just make a jelly roll style cake rather than using his fancy wreath method) and a homemade poppy filling (you can also buy canned poppy filling).

Here's the recipe for poppy filling
3 cups poppy seeds
6 tbs earth balance
2/3 cup sugar (you may need to add more to taste, I usually use about a cup)
1 teaspoon lemon zest
(many people add some ground walnuts, my family doesn't, but it would be about 2/3 cup)

Pour boiling water over the poppy seed and drain, then repeat. Cover with boiling water and soak for 30 minutes or longer. Drain over a fine sieve. Grind the poppy seed in the blender, then put into a pot. Heat and add the remaining ingredients, cooking until any remaining water is cooked off.


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 Post subject: Re: Family Holiday Food Traditions
PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 3:48 pm 
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We make Puerto Rican pasteles! They're similar in structure to tamales, but instead of corn, the masa is a green banana base. It's grated up and mixed with oil and broth and it's usually filled with bits of pork but my mom leaves just puts olives in mine (and now she's starting to prefer hers this way too). The mix is folded up in banana leaves or (as my family prefers) parchment paper and boiled. so much yum.

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 Post subject: Re: Family Holiday Food Traditions
PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 6:04 pm 
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mandycoot wrote:
We always have Swedish meatballs (köttbular) and lingonberries on Christmas! (Traditionally we would have lutfisk but even all the non-vegans are pretty much over that at this point.) And we do cardamom bread too! For Christmas day brunch we do Swedish pancakes and pea soup. I'm still working on a perfect vegan version of my mom's pannkakor recipe.

My mom also makes cookies and toffee for gifts every Christmas. She even makes vegan versions of toffee, pepparkakor and pecan shortbread cookies (like a Mexican wedding cookie but apparently Swedish?). This year I'm doing mazarines as well.
My ex is Swedish, and even though we aren't together any more, I still love meatballs with lingonberries! If you're interested, this is how I do them (you could obviously substitute home-made for frozen; I'm just lazy); they always go over really well at my house.

http://elizaveganpage.blogspot.com/2010/04/swedish-meatless-balls-with-mushroom.html

My youngest son's birthday is December 12th, and it's always on my to-do list to make lussekatter; this is the year it's going to happen!

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 Post subject: Re: Family Holiday Food Traditions
PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 6:32 pm 
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Growing up we ate at two places....my dad's family would have relatives down from Sicily, pasta, canoli and the like...My mom's family would do food platters and my grandpa would make these mini chili weenies, I want to recreate those chili weenies now.

I feel sad because the boyfriend does not have any food traditions. I want to try to make some things from my childhood now to share with him.

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 Post subject: Re: Family Holiday Food Traditions
PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 7:00 pm 
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Desdemona wrote:
mandycoot wrote:
We always have Swedish meatballs (köttbular) and lingonberries on Christmas! (Traditionally we would have lutfisk but even all the non-vegans are pretty much over that at this point.) And we do cardamom bread too! For Christmas day brunch we do Swedish pancakes and pea soup. I'm still working on a perfect vegan version of my mom's pannkakor recipe.

My mom also makes cookies and toffee for gifts every Christmas. She even makes vegan versions of toffee, pepparkakor and pecan shortbread cookies (like a Mexican wedding cookie but apparently Swedish?). This year I'm doing mazarines as well.
My ex is Swedish, and even though we aren't together any more, I still love meatballs with lingonberries! If you're interested, this is how I do them (you could obviously substitute home-made for frozen; I'm just lazy); they always go over really well at my house.

http://elizaveganpage.blogspot.com/2010/04/swedish-meatless-balls-with-mushroom.html

My youngest son's birthday is December 12th, and it's always on my to-do list to make lussekatter; this is the year it's going to happen!


Thanks for the recipe! I'll have the try that one. My son's namsdag is Dec. 5 (Sven) and maybe I'll do lussekatter a little early to celebrate!


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 Post subject: Re: Family Holiday Food Traditions
PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 7:09 pm 
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My mom always made cinnamon rolls for Christmas morning and I have done vegan ones for the past three or four years? It's a pain in the asparagus to make cinnamon rolls on Christmas Eve, but they are so delicious and it makes the house smell like Christmas. I let them rise overnight in the fridge and then pop them in the oven in the morning.

My mom also made peanut brittle to give as gifts, and I'd like to start that up again, too.

I love to buy whole nuts and have them out with a nut cracker the month of December.

And of course, nog. Can't go without the nog.


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 Post subject: Re: Family Holiday Food Traditions
PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 7:09 pm 
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My family heritage is Norwegian so at Christmas we make big cookie platters to take to work/friends/businesses we like. There are lots of kinds of cookies on them, but always krumkake, rosettes, kringla, and cookies we call white mice which are those delightful pecan butter cookies known by lots of other names (Mexican wedding cookies, etc). I used to make berlinerkranser which were my favorite but they have hard boiled egg yolks in them and I have no idea how to replace that.

We also get together and make lots of lefse. We make vegan lefse first them switch to the regular one. It's my favorite thing about Christmas. Spread with lots of earth balance and sprinkled with some sugar, I want to make some right now.

Christmas morning we used to make aebleskiver but I was the one that did that and I haven't made them in years since the recipe called for egg whites. I might borrow the pan from my mom and see how our pancake recipe works in it since that's basically what they are.

This year I want to make tamales. I just want some and it seems like a fun new thing to try.

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 Post subject: Re: Family Holiday Food Traditions
PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 7:20 pm 
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mandycoot wrote:
We always have Swedish meatballs (köttbular) and lingonberries on Christmas! (Traditionally we would have lutfisk but even all the non-vegans are pretty much over that at this point.) And we do cardamom bread too! For Christmas day brunch we do Swedish pancakes and pea soup. I'm still working on a perfect vegan version of my mom's pannkakor recipe.

My mom also makes cookies and toffee for gifts every Christmas. She even makes vegan versions of toffee, pepparkakor and pecan shortbread cookies (like a Mexican wedding cookie but apparently Swedish?). This year I'm doing mazarines as well.

We always have cucumber salad and rice pudding. The trick is to not be the one stuck making the pudding because you stir and stir and stir. It becomes a Tom Sawyer-esq challenge to pass the stirring off to someone else.

I haven't tried vegan köttbular yet because my mor-mor never served them with any sauce or gravy and I don't know who they would taste.

I am sorry to report that lutfisk is still a star at my family's house. *shudder*

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 Post subject: Re: Family Holiday Food Traditions
PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 7:33 pm 
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My mom made chocolates every year when I was a kid. Once I moved out on my own, I asked to borrow her moulds and she's never asked for them back - I guess she was tired of it and was glad to have someone else take up the torch!

This is the first year I'll be trying to work with vegan white chocolate and I'm a little scared, since I've only ever used the "candy coating wafers" in the past, which are sadly not vegan. Real chocolate is harder to work with. Wish me luck!

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 Post subject: Re: Family Holiday Food Traditions
PostPosted: Tue Dec 04, 2012 7:42 pm 
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Vantine wrote:
I haven't tried vegan köttbular yet because my mor-mor never served them with any sauce or gravy and I don't know who they would taste.
Make mine - seriously!
Vantine wrote:
I am sorry to report that lutfisk is still a star at my family's house. *shudder*
Blech. My nightmares are still haunted by the memory of lutfisk and the (hideous and infamous) infamous Janssons frästelse: http://allrecipes.com/recipe/janssons-temptation-janssons-frestelse/. GAG. All I could ever think was that if that constituted a "temptation," then Jansson really needed to get out more!

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