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 Post subject: Re: Beginning Bikers
PostPosted: Tue Jun 18, 2013 12:12 am 
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Louzilla wrote:
I don't know anything about tire levers but I do know my tires will be a little harder to change because of my beautiful vintage bike's set up!

My knees hurt a little today and I'm not sure whether it's because I haven't ridden in a while (and, as noted before, biking is so different from anything else) or I'm doing something wrong. Maybe, like Root, my seat should be changed? My brother said it was fine at first but I felt a little far from the ground when stopping, so the guy lowered it about an inch.


You might want to raise it back up. You want your leg to be mostly straight when extended at the bottom of your pedal stroke. If your leg is bent too much (i.e. your saddle is too low), it will give you knee pain.

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 Post subject: Re: Beginning Bikers
PostPosted: Tue Jun 18, 2013 4:53 am 
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For me, the perfect height for my saddle means I can only just get my toes to brush the ground on one side when I stop, but I do have quite long legs for my height and am fairly tall at 5'8".

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 Post subject: Re: Beginning Bikers
PostPosted: Tue Jun 18, 2013 7:06 am 
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The PPK encouraged me to mess with my saddle height (and get a new one, because my sit bones have a very wide displacement!) and yeah, I have to sort of fall sideways for my foot to touch the ground. At first I found this very unnerving! But now it's just part of life.

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 Post subject: Re: Beginning Bikers
PostPosted: Tue Jun 18, 2013 7:25 am 
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For me perfect seat height is based way more off when my leg is almost fully extended in the down pedal position, since I come off the seat at a stop anyways. (Not sure why, just something I do, probably related to the fact that I ride clipless)

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 Post subject: Re: Beginning Bikers
PostPosted: Tue Jun 18, 2013 7:39 am 
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lillianp wrote:
For me perfect seat height is based way more off when my leg is almost fully extended in the down pedal position, since I come off the seat at a stop anyways. (Not sure why, just something I do, probably related to the fact that I ride clipless)

correct.
It is best to get used to lowering yourself over the top tube when you stop, then lifting yourself back up onto the seat with your pedal strokes when you start up again. In theory, you should not be on your seat when you're stopped. Sounds goofy, but it allows for correct seat adjustment.


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 Post subject: Re: Beginning Bikers
PostPosted: Tue Jun 18, 2013 9:48 am 
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Thanks for confirming the top tube position. One of the most important things for me when I was looking for a bike was that there was plenty of clearance between my lady parts and the top tube. I actually went into a bike shop and a newbie salesperson (an acquaintance who used to work at a running store in town) tried to convince me that it was okay to have a too-tall top tube. She said that when she came to a stop on her bike she would always tip the frame sideward so it was shorter. I wasn't buying it.

I will practice lifting myself back into the seat from a stopped position. So far, that's been pretty clunky for me on the trail.


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 Post subject: Re: Beginning Bikers
PostPosted: Tue Jun 18, 2013 10:07 am 
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Yeah, if I need to ride a too-large frame, for example if I'm test riding a bike I worked on I am borrowing a bike, I will tip it to the side a little when I'm stopped to accommodate that too tall top tube. But really, you should have about an inch or so clearance on a road bike, and about two inches on a mountain bike.


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 Post subject: Re: Beginning Bikers
PostPosted: Tue Jun 18, 2013 10:39 am 
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Good: I rode the 16 mile route again and most of my ride was great.

Bad: I had a collision. (Two days in a row. Now I feel shitty.) There's this awkward turn in the trail where you are going downhill and then surprise you turn onto a bridge. The bridge has 3 ballards but they aren't evenly spaced. I can fit easily through the space on the left. The one on the right is smaller and I need to slow down and hit it right.

Well I hit it wrong. Really wrong. Whacked into the rightmost ballard and somehow my body went from there to slamming into the (metal cagey style) bridge itself. Thank fork I was wearing my helmet because I hit my head, along with apparently every other body part I had.

After I made sure my neck wasn't injured, I got back up and put the chain (which had come off) back on my bike and rode the last three miles to work. So I'm proud of that but overall I feel like a shiitake for hitting a forking stationary object.

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 Post subject: Re: Beginning Bikers
PostPosted: Tue Jun 18, 2013 10:43 am 
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coldandsleepy wrote:
So on Friday, I finally tried the longer route to work that means I don't have to take the light rail. It's about 16 miles and took me right around 1:15 to ride. It was awesome! It's a multi-use path through nice trees and stuff, with all of one road crossing. (Well, the first 3 miles-- before the path starts-- is city riding but not so bad.) The time savings of not having to take the ultra slow light rail (and wait around for it) meant I got to work at almost the same time despite riding three times as far.


Congrats! Being able to ride farther and get there in the same time is amazing. 32miles a day will make you a strong rider and keep you from sitting on a crowded train, As for the pedestrian on the MUP, I think you have to assume that everyone wears headphones in BOTH ears at max volume and wont be able to hear you. I do think as the fastest moving vehicle on a path, bike riders need to be extra cautious to the sporadic behavior of runners, but sometimes theres nothing you can really do.

Wow, just read your recap of today... how fast do you usually ride on the trail? What kind of brakes does your bike have? Maybe they need some adjusting?

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 Post subject: Re: Beginning Bikers
PostPosted: Tue Jun 18, 2013 11:13 am 
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I'm not sure how fast I'm going. My next purchase was going to be one of those little on bike odometer things (but now it will be another new freaking helmet). I am slowing way down on the sections that tend to have pedestrians, but there are a lot of flat stretches where you can see way down the trail and there are almost never people, at least at this time of day, and I do go faster on them. Especially now that I have done the trail a couple of times and have a better feel for who is going to be where at this time of day.

The brakes are for sure shitty. They're cheap asparagus v-brakes that have never been great but are now actually bad. (I don't know why either. The brake pads are fine, but it's like I can't get the brackety bit centered over the wheel right. If you breathe on it wrong, then one of the brake pads rubs while you're riding and you have to stop and fuss with it again.)

I've been strongly considering getting a new bike because there are a lot of things I don't love about this one (like the shitty brakes and the fact that it weighs more than my younger son) and this has maybe moved me closer. (Maybe it should have moved me further the other way though? Maybe I am bad at this and should stop? Bleh.)

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 Post subject: Re: Beginning Bikers
PostPosted: Tue Jun 18, 2013 11:17 am 
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Maybe you'd go even faster with a newer, lighter bike. And hopefully stop better!

Your brakes sound scary--I hope you can get them looked at and tuned up. Be careful out there!


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 Post subject: Re: Beginning Bikers
PostPosted: Tue Jun 18, 2013 11:48 am 
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coldandsleepy wrote:
Maybe I am bad at this and should stop? Bleh.)


NO no no no no no no NO!!!!!!!!


NO!

You are great at this!

32 mile-a-day commute is amazing. You deserve a nice lighter bike with good brakes. Bad brakes is how you crash into a stationary object (or, too long a reach). You don't have to get the best bike in the world, but do get one that is responsive with reliable brakes. Think of what you will save on new helmets!


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 Post subject: Re: Beginning Bikers
PostPosted: Tue Jun 18, 2013 12:21 pm 
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^Yes, this.

Also, I think a LOT of people feel like they're "bad" at cycling or that it's too hard or whatever because they have crappy (or ill-suited or ill-fitting or broken down) bikes. I don't know what your bike is like, but it sounds like maybe it's not in the greatest shape, which, combined with its heavy weight, will just make it feel harder and scarier than it has to. If you have the money to get a new bike, I totally recommend it! Do you know what you'd want in a new bike?

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 Post subject: Re: Beginning Bikers
PostPosted: Wed Jun 19, 2013 6:32 pm 
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I am normally pretty sweaty but lard lard biking makes me sweat. I was just tooling around the neighborhood for a bit and now feel like I need 14 showers. I need to invest in some super absorbent body suits that will gently wick away the sweat whilst simultaneously creating a pleasant lavender aroma. Like biking through the fields of southern France on a gentle spring day. To the baguettes!

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 Post subject: Re: Beginning Bikers
PostPosted: Wed Jun 19, 2013 9:43 pm 
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PPK, I really appreciate your feedback and encouragement. Also, this gave me a much needed laugh at work:

~Sz wrote:
Think of what you will save on new helmets!


And is my official reason why I need a new bike.

I can spend in the neighborhood of 1k on a bike. (Maybe a little more but it's iffy.) What I want in a bike is:
brakes that aren't shitty
parts that can be replaced when I inevitably break them
drop handlebars
something that can go on roads primarily, though the longer route I'm doing is on a paved multi-use trail that is pretty bumpy in spots sooo maybe not ultra-thin road tires?
something that is not super heavy, though I'm guessing anything that weighs less than 30 lbs (current bike) is going to feel light to me
a frame that will last me; I am okay with improving/upgrading other stuff over time but I want this to be a frame I can spend the next few years with at least

Beyond commuting, I think it would be super fun to ride in a century (or a half century) some day. Buuuut mostly it would be a commuter bike.

Also, I have to be straight up about this: I'm only riding the 16 mile route the way in! On the way back I'm going the windy route, which is a little over 5 miles. (And then I ride 1.5 miles from downtown to my house on either end of the commute, so like 24 miles a day.) I'm scared to do the longer route in the afternoon because I hear this trail gets busy and with my recent history, I am worried about bumping off pedestrians.

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 Post subject: Re: Beginning Bikers
PostPosted: Thu Jun 20, 2013 8:24 am 
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1k will get you a very nice bike for commuting.

A couple questions:
Do you lock your bike up at work or bring it inside? If so is theft a big issue where you live?
Do you plan to use fenders or racks?

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 Post subject: Re: Beginning Bikers
PostPosted: Thu Jun 20, 2013 8:50 am 
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I lock it up at work (with a nice u-lock, not like a chain). The facility I work at is pretty remote and you have to badge in through security to get to the area I lock up in, so I'm not very concerned about theft.

Probably no on fenders... I don't really get the point and the ones on my current bike mostly just make noise and fall off. As soon as I get to work, I change clothes, so don't care about dirt splattering up on me or whatever.

I don't think I want a rack but maybe? Currently I carry all my stuff in my backpack and that's fine. All I really carry with me is food, water, a change of clothes and first aid stuff.

Yesterday I had the day off from work and went on a great hike... And at the very end I fell and hit myself half the places I hit on Tuesday. So today I'm trying to take it easy and am going the shorter route both in and back. Which means that instead of riding my bike, I am sitting on the light rail. After waiting for the light rail. It is reminding me why I wanted to go the longer route to start with.

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 Post subject: Re: Beginning Bikers
PostPosted: Thu Jun 20, 2013 9:50 am 
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C&S - good luck with the bike shopping. My preference for getting around is a touring bike - they're faster than, say, a mountain bike or most city bikes, but less aggressive and easier to carry stuff than road bikes. You could get something purty nice that's used for under a grand.

In the mean time: on your shitty v-brakes, there should be tiny screws on the arms - right by where they attach to the frame. Tightening the screw adds tension to the spring on that side, thus pulls the brake pad away from the rim. So to center the brakes, do a combo of tightening the side that is dragging and loostening the side that is too far away. If that does not work (or there are no screws) there are a couple of other remedies to try. Once they are centered, you might be able to tighten the brakes more for better stopping power.

Also, I don't want to assume a lack of knowledge, so please don't read this as condescending, but I do see a lot of new cyclists who are afraid of using front brakes alot, because someone told them they could flip themselves over their handlebars.But your front brakes are really important, and they have something like 70% of your stopping power. They are your friends, and you will only flip yourself if you are going really fast and slam them with no rear brakes.


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 Post subject: Re: Beginning Bikers
PostPosted: Thu Jun 20, 2013 10:10 am 
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Whoa, you are going to fly on a new bike if your current one is 30lbs! And whether your commute is 5 miles or 50 miles, you are awesome regardless for being a bike commuter! A century is definitely within your sites. So, for that reason, you may not want to put racks and stuff on your bike particularly if you don't mind riding with a backpack.

Depending on where you are, your area may have a good selection of used bikes. It's fun and great to get a new one; but for me, for around town, I love my steel framed road bike. I have gator skin tires on it, so, not that I would go off-roading on it, but I worry less about flats. I have an easily removable basket on the front.

I wouldn't have known about how great this used bike is though without having bought my good road bike new (they are both Giants; the steel one is 20 years old and they have super similar geometry.) Giant is a solid company to look at as they have a good range of all sorts of bikes, as does Trek.

Go bikes! With the tour coming up and the nice weather, this is a peak buying season for bicycles, so your local bike stores should have good staff on hand with solid recommendations. Definitely bring your helmet and whatever shoes you wear with you and plan on substantial test rides of a variety of bikes. Try bikes out of your price range just to get a feel for them as well; it may be the components you like better, and those can be switched out. Finally, never judge a bike by it's seat, which it sounds like you already know. Bring your comfortable seat with you, even, for test rides. And then, once you know what you want in a bike, you will be in a better position to judge used bikes if you decide to go that route. But if you do, bring it to your local shop for a professional fitting and tune up.

Either way, have fun shopping and take your time!


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 Post subject: Re: Beginning Bikers
PostPosted: Thu Jun 20, 2013 10:28 am 
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Yeah, I have read that before about braking... someone also told me it's important to hit the back brake slightly earlier than the front brake (but I think in practice I'm squeezing them at the same time) and that that helps minimize any risk of flipping for some reason. Maybe that's not true though!

Thanks a lot for the advice on re-centering my brakes-- I will give that a try tonight and see if it helps.

I would love to buy a used bike but like Sz mentioned, I don't really know what to look for in a used bike/how to tell if it's worth going out to look at something etc. Santa Cruz is pretty bike-tastic and probably a hundred bikes go by on Craigslist every week, which is both the good thing and the bad thing... so much goes by that I have no idea how to filter out the ones I might want to look at from the ones that aren't worth trucking across town for. Also, I don't know the right questions to ask about it or know how to tell visually if there's anything wrong with it. So I'm inclined to buy this one new (and then maybe for my NEXT next bike, I'll be ready for a used one, heh).

That is a good idea to bring my seat along!

Yesterday while I was replacing my helmet, I actually had a talk with the bike shop guy where I think I didn't sound like a totally clueless noob. In the past I've been unable to speak coherently on the subject even when I knew what I was talking about, because I am intimidated by all knowledgeable friendly people everywhere. (Don't ask, it doesn't have to make sense.) This is a big step forward for me. BIG.

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 Post subject: Re: Beginning Bikers
PostPosted: Thu Jun 20, 2013 10:55 am 
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For some ideas on new touring bikes: I a think a new trek 520 (my love that was stolen away from me) or Raleigh sojourner run a little more than 1,000. As much as I hate to suggest REI, they have a house brand of bikes, Novara, that runs a little less and is good quality. I think a Surley Longhaul Trucker goes for about 1,000, I think? Biancchi's Volpe also makes a great commuter and is a bit less than 1,000 I think.
Anyhow I know you say you don't know about a rack, but a rack and panniers or even a milk crate can be a real game changer in terms of utility. Not carying stuff on your back is a lot more comfortable, and being able to carry more stuff will encourage you to use your bike for more things, like running errands.


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 Post subject: Re: Beginning Bikers
PostPosted: Thu Jun 20, 2013 12:09 pm 
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That's exciting, C&S!

For me, since I didn't know a whole lot about bikes when I bought one for real the first time, I found it was much less daunting to buy a complete new bike. That said, you can probably find some good deals on last year or 2011 models at some places, or ebay, or whatever, and those are probably worth checking out if you find things in your size.

As far as specific bike recommendations, a Cannondale Caad 10 might be SLIGHTLY above your price range, but if you can find an extra $200 or so, they are GREAT bikes. Full disclosure: I'm biased, since that's what my road bike is, but seriously, it's taken me from doing recreational and charity rides (and commuting!) to racing 2 or 3 times a week. I love that bike.

A quick ebay search brought this up, which is interesting, and potentially your size: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Cannondale-CAAD ... 19de16e4c1

All that said, I think the best thing you can d is go around to some different shops and try out a bunch of stuff to see what fits you and what you like.

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 Post subject: Re: Beginning Bikers
PostPosted: Thu Jun 20, 2013 2:37 pm 
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I do second Cannondale; they are a bit more $$ but definitely a solid brand. Mr. Sz loves his and has had zero problems.

There is definitely a lot to be said for buying new. And, it's always OK to have more than one bike! (I won't do errands on my carbon bike, just like I won't ride over 30 miles on the steel bike. It's just the way they are set up.)

Also, having an earnest desire to learn is a much better attitude going into the bike store than trying to dazzle anyone with knowledge, which, in the end, is mostly opinion anyway. Just be upfront with your needs and they will match you to a good steed. Local bike stores don't want to just make a sale; they want to gain a loyal customer. To that end, you may get a year of free tuneups, or a 10% store discount for a year (which for us, turned into for life, it seems) the mechanics get to know your bike, and a six pack now and again keeps everyone happy. It's their job to know bikes -- so you don't have to (beyond the basics, flat changing, brake adjusting!! -- if possible; some chain stuff, keeping things clean).


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 Post subject: Re: Beginning Bikers
PostPosted: Thu Jun 20, 2013 2:46 pm 
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^ I second all of this.

Also, I highly recommend Sports Basement as a Cannondale dealer. They've been nothing but great to me, with both bikes I bought from them.

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 Post subject: Re: Beginning Bikers
PostPosted: Thu Jun 20, 2013 11:28 pm 
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coldandsleepy wrote:
I can spend in the neighborhood of 1k on a bike. (Maybe a little more but it's iffy.) What I want in a bike is:
brakes that aren't shitty
parts that can be replaced when I inevitably break them
drop handlebars
something that can go on roads primarily, though the longer route I'm doing is on a paved multi-use trail that is pretty bumpy in spots sooo maybe not ultra-thin road tires?
something that is not super heavy, though I'm guessing anything that weighs less than 30 lbs (current bike) is going to feel light to me
a frame that will last me; I am okay with improving/upgrading other stuff over time but I want this to be a frame I can spend the next few years with at least

Beyond commuting, I think it would be super fun to ride in a century (or a half century) some day. Buuuut mostly it would be a commuter bike.

I was in the exact same boat as you a few years ago. I ended up with my Surly Cross Check which I love and ride every day. My decision was definitely influenced by us already having one in the family and half the guys at the shop owning them. I also really wanted a steel bike since I've always heard they last longer and are more comfortable on longer rides (more comfy than aluminum, I have no idea about carbon - I'm too cheap/accident-prone to consider it). All the brands mentioned before are really good solid bikes and any one would work. It's all about test riding until one feels so super fun that you don't want to stop. You've got a really nice budget so it should be fun shopping.

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