| Register  | FAQ  | Search | Login 
It is currently Tue Apr 28, 2015 1:00 am

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 13 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Helgonblommas low-budget-cookbook-for-one-in-the-making
PostPosted: Sat Feb 28, 2015 7:19 am 
Offline
Huffs Nutritional Yeast

Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2015 1:34 pm
Posts: 114
Location: Stockholm, Sweden
Decided to start a new thread instead of continuing to "hijack" the "Cookbooks you wish someone would write"-thread.

The basic idea behind the cookbook I'm writing on right now is this:
Quote:
Struggling with being unemployed several times in my life (like now) and thus having very little money (we're talking about existence minimum levels here...) I needed a cookbook which
* with a rather small but very carefully selected set of vegan ingredients (none of them too expensive, every one of them selected for total nutritional value for the cost - i.e. not only focussing on the normal fat, protein, carbs but even more focussing on things like iron, calcium, zinc, B-and other vitamins and minerals)
* has a mealplan for longer periods of time where each and every day will guarantee the minimal nutritional value with those selected ingredients (and on "normal" currently scientifically suggested calorie and vitamin- and mineral-levels per day - not like some books on this theme which promise a vegan (or other) diet on only a couple of $ per day but when you sit down and do the math only achieve this with like 500-800 kcal / day instead of around 2000 kcal / day and with severe deficits in especially the mineral levels if you compute them!
* explicitely states the average cost per recipe and some of the ingredients with suggestions for cheaper swaps with about the same nutritional value
* very much relies on "cook big batches of grains and lentils or peas or even meal components and freeze in individual portions" - so that even the days the energy levels are rather low I know I can take out 2-3 freezer bags of the freezer, put them in the microwave, whip up some dressing or salad and know I'll get at least part of the daily intake of all essential nutritiants in the right proportions.

Writing it most for my own sake (and mostly for that reason to for one person only - another shortcoming of existing cookbooks; especially since you simply cannot afford to throw eatables away when you'r on a minimal budget!) since I'd have needed this badly several times in my life.


Quote:
I have to watch the carbohydrate percents very carefully for my own health reasons (having NOT done this in the past partly due to much relying on the "cheapest food" (i.e. often barley and lentils or the like for too long periods)) so I can't have too much "flour-heavy/grain-mostly" recipes even if they would make it even cheaper. But some I do have of course, but more balanced.

So it has to be a mix of different food items in nearly every recipe to get the balance right AND not too high carbs percents - with the cost as limiting factor. A kind of puzzle in several dimensions :)
"Number-crunching everything" :P is the whole idea of this cookbook :) (and "cook big batches of stuff once a week and freeze in portion sizes" - fortunately the high living costs here mean higher living standards as well so a freezer (sometimes even a huge one) is considered "basic stuff" in the apartments.


Quote:
For the record: the current estimate of costs here in Stockholm, Sweden for that -complete- list of ingredients above equivalents right now to 2,01 US$ (or 18 SEK) per meal or about US$6,08 (54 SEK) per day (35 days and 3 whole nutritionally balanced meals a day) [currently about 46 euros per week] - and this in a country known for its high living costs ... I might be able to get it down a bit more when finished with the whole thing (basically working "backwards" from the nutrition needs and the nutritional value of selected ingredients to sketches of recipes which undergo thorough testing both ingredient-ways and flavor-wise).
Of course it will get a bit more expensive if you want mostly organically grown stuff ...


Re: Vital Wheat gluten
Quote:
Fortunately yes - and if I can't afford to travel into town their postage is moderate so I can order it online. But even here I'm not making "pure" seitan cutlets but I do mix in both beans and in some cases raw (alfasprouts) or parboiled sprouts (yellow peas and / or chickpeas) as well to get it more balanced (with regard to the mineral contents this time though :) ...). I also use vital wheat gluten to both up the protein content of several other things and to get a better structure without using too much flour or carb-heavy bread-crumbs (my barley-hamburger-bread-rolls and the mixed-vegetable-burgers for instance).


Quote:
I think sprouts simply a miracle :) - very cheap to make (especially if you buy the seeds/beans anyway for normal cooking as well), very easy to tend (especially using the stapled-colanders-on-the-counter-method which has served me for years), just needing 2-4 rinses per day work-wise, always-ready and fresh if you set a small new set some times per week, great-tasting, filling (even if mixed into other stuff), powerhouses of vitamins if eaten raw (those you can eat raw) and still powerhouses of minerals if parboiled (like some of the beans you have to parboil to inactivate some enzymes) AND good sources of protein with the carb-percents decreasing as sprouting goes on. And so many different varieties! The list could go on :)


Last edited by helgonblomma on Sat Feb 28, 2015 7:23 am, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Helgonblommas low-budget-cookbook-for-one-in-the-making
PostPosted: Sat Feb 28, 2015 7:21 am 
Offline
Huffs Nutritional Yeast

Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2015 1:34 pm
Posts: 114
Location: Stockholm, Sweden
Quote:
The complete list of ingredienst I'm experimenting with right now (it might change as the cookbook progresses!) The current mealplan I'm working on covers 35 days.
The style could be described as ”//low-sugar//, //high//-whole-grain-whole-greens-whole-fruits-cooking-from-scratch with lots of fresh homemade sprouts”

@ small packets of: cashewnuts, dried pineapple, dried apricots and flax seeds,
@ whole sesame seeds (mostly for sesame milk making – they are really a wonder calcium-wise), a small bottle of vegan mayonnaise*,
@ vitan wheat gluten, xanthan gum, baking powder, baking soda, dried yeast, vanilla powder+,
@ green lentils (partly for sprouting), red lentils, yellow peas (partly for sprouting), kidney beans, chickpeas (partly for sprouting), soy beans (for both soymilk-making* and some recipes), black beans, white beans, alfalfa-seeds (for sprouting)
@ baby food (for cheap flavoring), cocoa powder, 100 g dark chocolate (for decorating and some very-small-quantity-flavoring),
@ the smallest bottle of flax/lineseed oil (for the omega-3) to be found, small bottles of olive oil and canola oil, vitamin-D2-fortified vegan margarine (which is essential up here north in winter),
@ lettuce, basil and parsley for planting and tending on the counter
@ frozen% cauliflower, broccoli, corn, spinach&, blueberries&, black currants&;
@ small amounts of fresh cocktail-tomatoes, lots of fresh bananas (partly for freezing), some fresh apples&, a very few bell peppers (for freezing in small portion sizes),
@ lots of standard onions, lots of carrots, some potatoes, some parsnips, lots of cabbage, some garlic, some beets;
@ lots of rolled oats, whole millet, rolled millet/millet flour, lots of whole barley, some polenta, some quinoa (the most expensive item on the list but it does up the protein quality so much even in small quantities that I think it is worth including despite its high cost), some brown rice;
@ the smallest bottle of balsamic vinegar to be found (it's going to be used drop-wise), buillon powder/cubes, bottled lemon juice*, ketchup (for the lycopen), tamari/soy sauce, herbamare (salt with herbs)*, salt, fresh ginger (to be frozen), sauerkraut, 1 packet of nori sheets (partly for grinding for flavoring)
@ apple cider vinegar, (dijon)mustard*,
@ for spices: turmeric, coriander, cumin, black pepper, cinnamon, ground ginger; ”nooch”/nutritional yeast (Vitamin-B-12-fortified!), some small bag of dried shiitakes (or the like, I have found shiitakes cheapest in the asia shops around here)
@ flours: buckwheat-flour, lots of wheat graham/whole wheat flour, lots of barley flour, cornflour, brown rice flour, rye flour, oat flour/skrädmjöl (a swedish specialty) and a little all-purpose-flour;
@ bread crumbs*; potato starch (cheapest around here, use any starch);
@ pasta: small packets each of fusilli, lasagna*, macaroni, 1 small packet of pad thai brown rice noodles and lots of spaghetti;
@ the smallest bottles of agavesyrup and maple syrup to be found (both are rather expensive over here), some raisins and a small packet of raw cane sugar/sucanat;
@ lingonberry jam*& (lingonberries/cowberries grow abundantly in Sweden and thus the jam is comparatively cheap even if you choose a high-quality lower-sugar type),
@ several cans of crushed tomatoes and a can of tomato paste (partly for freezing in table-spoon-quantities).

* Items marked with * are easy to make yourself (recipes included)
+ vanilla powder is more easily found around here – especially for a good price - than good-quality vanilla extract
% I use these stuffs frozen mostly because I can't afford to travel right now and because the nutritional value so quickly sinks if you have to store fresh greens. For a one-person-cookbook-on-low-budget-whole-year-applicable it simply is better to take out a few bits of broccoli from the freezer instead of having a bunch wilting and losing nutritional value in the fridge (or forcing you to eat broccoli every meal for a couple of days!) Of course you can buy fresh stuff and use it fresh – or freeze it yourself if you like.
& These items you could easily gather for yourself, grow yourself or maybe get fresh conveniently


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Helgonblommas low-budget-cookbook-for-one-in-the-making
PostPosted: Sat Feb 28, 2015 7:27 am 
Offline
Mispronounces Daiya
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 31, 2011 7:38 am
Posts: 1426
Location: Windmill row
Nice! I really hope writing this cookbook will work out for you.

_________________
Can you read Dutch? Kom eens kijken op Vegetus!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Helgonblommas low-budget-cookbook-for-one-in-the-making
PostPosted: Sat Feb 28, 2015 7:35 am 
Offline
Huffs Nutritional Yeast

Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2015 1:34 pm
Posts: 114
Location: Stockholm, Sweden
I hope so too, it is -badly- needed right now :-/... But it is progressing :-) albeit slowly but still :-)

Could you please copy over your comments to this thread as well? They were really good and interesting and would be nice to have here too - but since it's your thoughts I didn't copy them of course ...


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Helgonblommas low-budget-cookbook-for-one-in-the-making
PostPosted: Sat Feb 28, 2015 7:50 am 
Online
WELFARIST!
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2010 3:30 pm
Posts: 5028
Location: zomgz dijk
Good luck with your project! I would also love to see such a cookbook or zine.

_________________
ॐ लोकः समासतः सुखिनो भवन्तु
http://www.embracingtheworld.org


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Helgonblommas low-budget-cookbook-for-one-in-the-making
PostPosted: Sat Feb 28, 2015 8:47 am 
Offline
Huffs Nutritional Yeast
User avatar

Joined: Fri Oct 10, 2014 1:54 pm
Posts: 113
Location: Ireland
Heya helgonblomma, this sounds like a really interesting project.

I too mostly cook for myself and use frozen vegetables alot. I also cook up large batches of beans and freeze them in single or double portions.

One thing I am very intrigued by in your list is "baby food (for cheap flavouring)", I would love to know more!

_________________
"I'll be over here with my army OF MILITANT BEES"- eatsbabies
"You're not a real vegan unless there's spirulina in your cookies"- Moon
Twitter: @veganblueberry
Blog: http://blueberryblossoms.blogspot.com


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Helgonblommas low-budget-cookbook-for-one-in-the-making
PostPosted: Sat Feb 28, 2015 8:57 am 
Offline
Huffs Nutritional Yeast

Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2015 1:34 pm
Posts: 114
Location: Stockholm, Sweden
Blueberry wrote:
Heya helgonblomma, this sounds like a really interesting project.

I too mostly cook for myself and use frozen vegetables alot. I also cook up large batches of beans and freeze them in single or double portions.

One thing I am very intrigued by in your list is "baby food (for cheap flavouring)", I would love to know more!


Thanks :)

From the old thread my reply to Cornelie:
Quote:
Even the organic purés (those with the most flavor) rarely cost more than 10-15 SEK (and are available nearly anywhere) - and taking out the 1-2 tablespoons I need I freeze the rest in icecub-trays which gives me about 7-15 tablespoons more I can flavor several things in small quantities with during the month.


I found the original thought about using babyfood at all in the book "Vegan Unplugged" by Robin Robertson - and have since then often used it but obviously using the freezer for the leftovers. Even a simple pancake recipe for one person (so no big batches obviously!) can be varied in taste and color by 1-2 tablespoons babyfood-purés of for example frozen mango/apricot or apple/blueberry or strawberries/apples/oranges. Thus one little glass of babyfood for 10-15 SEK does wonders spread over the month - that's what I at least call cheap flavoring :)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Helgonblommas low-budget-cookbook-for-one-in-the-making
PostPosted: Sat Feb 28, 2015 9:00 am 
Offline
Huffs Nutritional Yeast
User avatar

Joined: Fri Oct 10, 2014 1:54 pm
Posts: 113
Location: Ireland
helgonblomma wrote:
From the old thread my reply to Cornelie:
Quote:
Even the organic purés (those with the most flavor) rarely cost more than 10-15 SEK (and are available nearly anywhere) - and taking out the 1-2 tablespoons I need I freeze the rest in icecub-trays which gives me about 7-15 tablespoons more I can flavor several things in small quantities with during the month.


I found the original thought about using babyfood at all in the book "Vegan Unplugged" by Robin Robertson - and have since then often used it but obviously using the freezer for the leftovers. Even a simple pancake recipe for one person (so no big batches obviously!) can be varied in taste and color by 1-2 tablespoons babyfood-purés of for example frozen mango/apricot or apple/blueberry or strawberries/apples/oranges. Thus one little glass of babyfood for 10-15 SEK does wonders spread over the month - that's what I at least call cheap flavoring :)


Do you just use fruit purées or do you use savoury baby food too?

_________________
"I'll be over here with my army OF MILITANT BEES"- eatsbabies
"You're not a real vegan unless there's spirulina in your cookies"- Moon
Twitter: @veganblueberry
Blog: http://blueberryblossoms.blogspot.com


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Helgonblommas low-budget-cookbook-for-one-in-the-making
PostPosted: Sat Feb 28, 2015 9:07 am 
Offline
Huffs Nutritional Yeast

Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2015 1:34 pm
Posts: 114
Location: Stockholm, Sweden
Blueberry wrote:

Do you just use fruit purées or do you use savoury baby food too?


So far I only have tried the fruit purés and developed recipes with them but I have some ideas for 1 or 2 savory vegan baby food glasses as well :) - but those are harder to get than the very popular fruit purés.


Last edited by helgonblomma on Sat Feb 28, 2015 9:10 am, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Helgonblommas low-budget-cookbook-for-one-in-the-making
PostPosted: Sat Feb 28, 2015 9:09 am 
Offline
Because Bob Barker Told Me To
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jul 01, 2012 9:00 am
Posts: 932
Location: Wales
That's a really good idea. I'm single and on a low income so something like this would be really useful. Best of luck with your book :)

_________________
MoFo blog :)
Rosie's vegan kitchen


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Helgonblommas low-budget-cookbook-for-one-in-the-making
PostPosted: Sat Feb 28, 2015 10:04 am 
Offline
Mispronounces Daiya
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 31, 2011 7:38 am
Posts: 1426
Location: Windmill row
helgonblomma wrote:
Could you please copy over your comments to this thread as well? They were really good and interesting and would be nice to have here too - but since it's your thoughts I didn't copy them of course ...

Here you go :-)
Cornelie wrote:
Interesting project Helgonblomma! I did something a little similar a while back, calculating how to get a nutritionally balanced and palatable menu for as little money as possible. My basic grocery list consisted of brown rice, oats, flour, lentils, chickpeas, peanut butter, sesame seeds, canola oil (for omegas), carrots, onion, frozen kale, tomato puree, raisins and a selection of spices. I took B12 and D supplements, because they were cheaper than fortified foods. Calcium was a major bottleneck. You can only eat so much kale and sesame, so adding some fortified plant milk or calcium supplements would be advisable. When budget allows you can add a larger variety of veggies to keep it interesting. Food is relatively cheap in the Netherlands, so this costs about €15 per week.

I made things like pancakes, bread, porridge, bean patties, stuffed pastries, pizza and soup. If you have a decent blender, you can get really creative with the pancakes by blending in soaked legumes and rice to up the nutritional value.

_________________
Can you read Dutch? Kom eens kijken op Vegetus!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Helgonblommas low-budget-cookbook-for-one-in-the-making
PostPosted: Mon Mar 02, 2015 12:43 am 
Offline
Huffs Nutritional Yeast

Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2015 1:34 pm
Posts: 114
Location: Stockholm, Sweden
What I would very much appreciate is if you could tell me if anything on that list (except for the quinoa and perhaps the xanthan gum) does jump out on you as "too expensive" or "too hard to get".

I did choose these ingredients after both studies of their nutritional value and a kind of sampling the prices in about 15 shops here in the Stockholm-area (so several others I had to not include since they either weren't readily available all-year-round or too expensive). Some of the items could be cheapest in the "ethnic" parts of supermarkets or in more specialised shops (asian/italian/oriental/african) in the town centre (or like around here out in the suburbs since it's here a great percentage of the people of foreign descent live).


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Helgonblommas low-budget-cookbook-for-one-in-the-making
PostPosted: Mon Mar 02, 2015 1:25 am 
Offline
Saggy Butt
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 12, 2011 4:38 pm
Posts: 1179
Location: Germany
Cool project, helgonblomma!

Nothing on the list jumps out as Too Expensive (except maple syrup, but I assume that'll only be used a little at a time). Buying so many things in the smallest size available can get expensive, though, IF the larger sizes available are cheaper by the ounce/ml/kg. When money's really tight, we don't always have a choice, I know.

_________________
"None of your fancy dandyisms please!" - interrobang?!

blog: Jaunty Dame


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 13 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group
Template made by DEVPPL/ThatBigForum and fancied up by What Cheer