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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Fri Jul 31, 2015 3:14 pm 
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Dr Bronners, MD
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so, i have some sort of volunteer squash in my garden. i thought it might have been a pumpkin? it looks like a pumpkin. but then i assumed it was a tatume since i had grown that a few years ago, and i think i might be right. :-) i picked it last night, and it was in fact a zucchini. yum! the borers haven't found it yet. the roots are growing underneath a kale plant. shhhh.

but the weird thing is that i don't think i let the tatume from a couple years ago rot in the garden. i do remember getting pickleworms that year, but i would have put the compost from that depressing loss in the back yard, and this is growing in the front yard. weird! this compost was from the town. i mean it's possible a squirrel brought it back out front and forgot about it. whatever, i'm glad i have a zucchini. i didn't intentionally plant any.

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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Fri Jul 31, 2015 3:54 pm 
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Seagull of the PPK
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pickleworms. they sound so funny but they are so terrible.

the waster bed is about half to three quarters of a meter wide and maybe 2 meters long. There are artichokes there that will be coming out later (i planted them as ornamentals for fun) and it is in front of two passionfruit vines. I know the roots for them went straight down, so I figure asparagus would be good since the roots will be at different levels (from what I gather). It is on a bit of a slant and the bottom is where there used to be a sandpile, so the drainage is great. Good call on improving the soil now, I will get out there this weekend maybe and work on it. I stepped on a nail bringing compost over there and had to interrupt garden duties for the day.

Erika, the good thing about the BOP if you ever do get it is that it needs almost no effort once it's in.

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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Fri Jul 31, 2015 8:27 pm 
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Saggy Butt
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Ouch on the nail - is your tetanus shot up to date? You can probably plant 10 - 12 asparagus seedlings there.

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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Sat Aug 01, 2015 7:48 am 
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Seagull of the PPK
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Well. The tetanus is probably two years out of date but the only way to get a booster involves the public health system (vaccines and cancer meds only go through the public system, and we do private pay). Since we last used the public system years ago we have moved and I`m not even sure where our local is, we have to re-establish residency, etc. and until this crazy project ends I dont have the time to dedicate to it.

The only alternative I found is a DTP, which may be usable as a booster, but I need to research it. I am a bit of a chicken about medical stuff and will probably end up getting the DTP but it seems like overkill. In the meantime.... I step on nails with alarming regularity so I cleaned it out really well and will keep an eye on it.

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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Sun Aug 02, 2015 5:44 pm 
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Saggy Butt
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DPT is the standard here; I would need to look up how frequently they suggest boosters, but I believe it is about every 8 - 10 years. I don't think it is overkill, as pertussis is really on the rise in the U.S. - but maybe not in Brazil? It's really serious for babies too young to be innoculated or anyone with a depressed immune system.

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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Mon Aug 03, 2015 8:29 am 
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Seagull of the PPK
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I think actually infantile tetanus is probably a bigger deal than pertussis- our disease profile is very different. People really haven't started *not* vaccinating their kids (you need to be immunized to go to school, and homeschooling is not permitted. Plus the vaccinable diseases are still present in living memory for most people, so people haven't yet started the anti-vaccine movement here, though the woo is growing), so the resurgent diseases like scarlet fever, whooping cough, etc are not the big issues. Tuberculosis and yellow fever are still big deals, though luckily I live in an area where these are mostly not present.
Good news is foot looks fine. Bad news is I took the nail right in the joint that I hurt a few months ago and I am so bloody sore.

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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Mon Aug 10, 2015 3:47 pm 
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Dr Bronners, MD
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my last tree collard cutting appears to have died. (i meant to spray the soil in the pot with nematodes last month or so, but it started to dounpour and lightening faster than i expected that night, and in an effort of self preservation, i ended up dumping the last of my sprayer contents out under my plum tree before realising i had forgotten my potted plants.) that was the 9th cutting. i had spent $45 on this venture. :-(

i had been leaving it on the porch in a pot next to the window all season because i was terrified of it dying. blergh. maybe some native soil predators would have fixed whatever was in the pot. i remember seeing a lot of centipedes, and i figured they were taking care of the problem. (they don't look like the symphylans that can be mistaken for centipedes. these are greyish, about 1/2 inch long and it looks like there's one long tail instead of 2) in addition, it had 2 rounds of powdery mildew, and i might have sprayed it at the wrong time of day. the sulfur stuff might have burnt the leaves in the sunlight. it's really sad how quickly the fresh leaves went powdery and then crispy. 2 days before it looked like a goner, i put some gnat soil covering on top of the soil. it's a pointy popped glass product. i wonder if that had sucked moisture from the stem.

anyway, i pulled it out of the pot, and there are no more roots, and the core is hollow toward the bottom. i cut off the hollow section and plopped it into a glass of water as a last ditch effort. i also snipped off 2 of the 3 wimpy side shoots and put them into their own glass of water. i might put those into some wet vermiculite instead. *sigh* i don't have optimistic feelings about any of this.

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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Thu Mar 17, 2016 5:05 pm 
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I started my seedlings and I'm obsessed with watching them: tomatoes, eggplant, peppers, even a cucumber that my sister told me not to plant yet!

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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Fri Mar 18, 2016 1:33 am 
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My tomatoes and herb's are growing strong, I put starters a few days ago and they are all so much bigger. I feel like seaweed fertilizers really help me.

And I planted watermelons from seeds this week. I've wanted to grow them since childhood! As a kid they never got bigger than a lemon. Apparently they are hard to grow so if anyone's got any tips lay um on me! My dream is giant melons.

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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Fri Mar 18, 2016 12:07 pm 
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Brain Made of Raw Seitan
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We're a bit behind you folks here (Last frost date isn't until mid-May or so) so I haven't actually started my seedling or planted spring crops outside yet, but I've been obsessively thinking about gardening! I live in a 6-unit cohousing type place, so a couple of my neighbors who are also gardeners are coming over tonight and we're going to do our garden planning. Then I'll probably start some seedlings this weekend for seeds we already have, and order some more that we want.

Two things I want to focus on this year are: perennial vegetables, now that I live somewhere indefinitely. (Asparagus! I've been researching other weird things like sea kale!) And most our courtyard is really shady, so shade-tolerant things. I foresee a variety of radishes, and other weird roots and leaves like parsley root, salsify, miner's lettuce, sorrel, dock!

Anyone else have any success or experience with either super shady areas, or perennial vegetables?


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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Fri Mar 18, 2016 12:17 pm 
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Our growing season is so much shorter up here, so I won't even be starting my seeds indoors until beginning-to-mid April. Then I'll plant end of May. I'm antsy, I want to do it now, but it's cold :(

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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Fri Mar 18, 2016 12:18 pm 
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Bought a used copy of Natural Harvest
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e_c I'm also interested in perennials! I'm curious about asparagus as I've heard it's pretty easy to grow. I wanna try.

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Did you notice the slight feeling of panic at the words "Chicken Basin Street"? Like someone was walking over your grave? Try not to remember. We must never remember. - mumbles
Is this about devilberries and nazifruit again? - footface


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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Fri Mar 18, 2016 1:08 pm 
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Brain Made of Raw Seitan
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My parents have grown it, and my dad and stepmom live in the upper peninsula of Michigan and at a higher elevation than surrounding towns, so they have a suuuuper short growing season- I would think your area would be more like lower Michigan? But asparagus has definitely worked for them, in fact it can seed itself and try to take over their beds! The only drawback is that it takes a couple years to get established before you can harvest it, but that just makes it perfect for a new homeowner!


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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Tue Mar 22, 2016 4:58 pm 
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Flat Chesty McNoBoobs
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I've mostly solidified my plans for this year:
Under the pine in the front yard, I've currently got some daffodils and tulips on one side, and I dug up the rest. Next month, I'll plant 2 dwarf blueberry (peach sorbet) and 2 honeyberry (like blueberry) bushes. I also threw in a pineberry, which is like a white strawberry, that I bought on a whim. We had the tree trimmed, so there's much more sun in the bed under the tree, and the berries should do well with the acidic soil. http://parkseed.com/product.aspx?p=3072 ... fgodLXYIJw

In the sad rose bed, I've pruned the rose sticks that are there currently and mixed some rose food into the soil, and I think there might be some life left in them (they're already looking better a week on) so we'll see. I planted a native wild rose and two hydrangeas, "nikko blue" and "pistachio" in there as well. We'll see what happens.
Image
Image

I've potted some chives, sage, lavender, and mint in pots that are out on the back deck in individual pots. I bought a large, pretty ceramic pot that I just put some honeysuckle and a few annuals in that will also go on the back deck. I realized after I potted them, though, that two of the ceramic pots I had don't have holes in the bottom, so stuff gets waterlogged. I'm hoping that if I keep an eye on them and drain off the excess until it dries up a bit, they'll be okay.

I also got a couple blue sage plants that I planted near the foundation around the side of the house to cover the foundation and make a scrubby, awkward area look a bit less so (I hope). I also got a crazy pieris japonica for the same area. I think I'll have to dig up the ugly mystery shrub that's there currently in order to plant it.
Image

I put in some basic annuals in a narrow partly-shaded bed on the west side of the yard just to see how they and some euphorbia where our yard meets the street. I probably planted the euphorbia both too close to the edge of the yard and too close together. I should be getting the bulbs for the dahlias I ordered in the fall soon, and those will go in the sunny strip along the walkway leading to the front door.

For veggies, I ordered a shiitake tonne of seeds from the Victory Seed Company (http://www.victoryseeds.com/), including two packs of glass gem corn:
Image
I've got a 10' x 3' plot in the back yard that I'll amend and start planting stuff in shortly, and I also just snagged a spot at the community garden (I take the dog to the schoolyard where it's located every weekday, so I figured I may as well get a plot). I'm going to do the three sisters thing there, since I'll have room to let the squashes spread out, and the garden gets loads and loads of sun.

The one other thing I'd like to do is figure out a good hedge/screen to put on the side of the front yard next to the driveway. I don't love the view of the neighbor's ugly lawn and broken-down RV.

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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Wed Apr 06, 2016 10:21 am 
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Wow! I find it hard to believe that glass gem corn is a real (and edible!) plant, not a set of beads stuck together or an impressive piece of Photoshop.

Everything else sounds good as well- I have a soft spot for hydrangeas and forest flames as we had them in our garden growing up. Berries sound yummy.

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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Wed Apr 06, 2016 5:58 pm 
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Saggy Butt
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That corn is beautiful. It says there are about 100 seeds per pack. Are you sharing your seed or planning on planting it all? Corn seed can stay viable for several years if stored properly, and I often order larger pkts of varieties if there is a price saving.

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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Fri Apr 08, 2016 10:41 am 
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i've been participating with the experimental farm network as of late [electric_claire, you might be interested in this]. they had a kickstarter, and they sent some packets as their thank you. they also had a questionnaire where you tell them what space you have and what you like to grow etc, and can you believe it, they have a participant who managed to not only get purple tree collards to flower, but they crossed it with a perennial kale (which is more hardy than tree collards) and they're sending me some to grow from seeds. it'll be such a huge genetic variability, but i hope some work out. (i just hope the beneficial genetics of the tree collards isn't tied to tenderness.) *fingers crossed*

another plant they paired me up with is a scarlet runner bean. i'll be letting that run up some coral sorghum (and maybe a butternut squash to complete a version of three sisters) the coral sorghum was from the kickstarter. it's good for both grain and sweet stems. (now i guess i need a sorghum press for the juice)

another kickstarter reward they sent was okra. i've never grown okra, but hey, what the heck? same with rhubarb and gbognome eggplant collards. (i don't know if i'm going to grow those. only the young leaves and fruit are edible. otherwise, they're poisonous.)

then i ordered some plants from the roughwood seed collection. tom thumb celeriac, luthy salsify, cypriot skouroupathcs leek, aji amarillo pepper (capsicum baccatum, apparently it'll be easier to keep this perennial for me, even though i might need to bring it inside) and finally, vine peach. a variety of tiny melon. cucumis melo (i hate my grape vine. it's way too vigorous, and the wasps get to the fruit before i can anyway. i was thinking of something to replace it with, and i think i'll try this this year, although i'm wondering if i should try something more perennial and maybe woody. but if these are amazing, then i will happily keep planting them.)

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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Mon Apr 11, 2016 7:00 pm 
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Jill wrote:
That corn is beautiful. It says there are about 100 seeds per pack. Are you sharing your seed or planning on planting it all? Corn seed can stay viable for several years if stored properly, and I often order larger pkts of varieties if there is a price saving.


I'm keeping everything in the fridge now, so I'll definitely just keep what I don't use. Looks like I'll have extra of a bunch of stuff.

I planted my greens, beets, carrots, and onions today. I need more compost to amend the rest of the garden so I can get the peas, beans, and eventually squash and cucumbers in there too.

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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Thu Apr 21, 2016 4:26 pm 
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I live in an apartment without a yard so I was thinking of doing a couple of window boxes this year. One for basil and one for flowers. I've never used window boxes before and I was wondering if there was anything I should know before I begin? Do you think there would be any greens or other veggies that would grow well in a window box?

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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Thu Apr 21, 2016 4:46 pm 
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Saggy Butt
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Are you talking about outside window boxes? If so, what will do well depends on how large they are and what sort of light/heat they're exposed to and how fast they dry out. If their exposure isn't too hot - lettuce, chard, parsley, and other smaller greens should do well, and you could plant chives or scallions too. If they're in full sun peppers should do well, especially the mini varieties, and I think there are some really dwarf tomato plants that could work too.

If inside, lots of other small herbs should do well, as well as mesclun mixes you can repeatedly cut.

Good luck!

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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Fri Apr 22, 2016 12:24 am 
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Is that Glass Gem corn meant to be more of a dried/decorative corn, or cob-style? Curious!

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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2016 11:24 am 
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Hip Goiter
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Helloooo

We just started a balcony garden in many big containers and my favorite things are dying or dead! I have no idea what I'm doing! We went to the garden center and a lady helped us buy all the soil and compost and bins and starter plants but nope not working. Do I need to use a Miracle Grow kind of thing? Can I use the dead plants as part of the compost in other containers or are they garden poison now? I have zero clues. I don't even know where to start really. Lady was like oh it'll all be foolproof but nope.

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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2016 3:17 pm 
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Are they too wet? The containers should have holes in the bottom so excess water can drain. It's easy to be a little too enthusiastic with the watering in the beginning.

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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Wed Jun 22, 2016 4:38 pm 
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Oh! No! I didn't know about the holes and the Lady didn't say anything! Ack! So I should make holes definitely or just water less? Do you put trays underneath so it has something to drain into?

thanks!

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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Thu Jun 23, 2016 8:11 am 
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You can totally compost the plants you kill. #askmehowiknow

Basically just don't compost weeds! Other than that you're good!

ETA: re the planters, if they don't have holes, do add them! An established, big plant needs more water than a new plant. A saucer underneath containers can be really valuable for established plants, especially if you have a breezy balcony. But while things are small and you're worried about overwatering, I'd err on the side of no saucer/just let the containers drain out.

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