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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Thu Jul 18, 2013 1:21 am 
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I think removing the growing point might cause the tomato to branch out more and thus set more fruit? But they seem to branch out without any help, so either way I don't see the point.

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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Thu Jul 18, 2013 1:59 am 
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I think letting it branch out too much just makes it super leafy. I always pluck out the 'suckers'. I think it helps. Is that what they mean by growing point? The parts in the armpits?

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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Thu Jul 18, 2013 7:49 am 
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the growing point is the apex. (i.e. the very tip.) but really, plants want to grow, so pinching the apex just makes it more bushy by creating a bunch more smaller apexes. so it's really what works best for you. having more side shoots means more tomatoes, and having less means bigger tomatoes.

pinching the side shoots (like mars does) just makes the main branch stronger since less energy is going off the side. (but also, less photosynthesis)

i just leave my plants to grow, unless they're just getting too big and leggy. if they look fine, then they stay as-is.

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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Thu Jul 18, 2013 8:52 am 
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Mars wrote:
No fretting! If you snip it, it will probably just sprout out a new vine to do it's growing from. :)


I wasn't sure I believed this, because I guess I'm stubborn and don't know anything about plants. A completely different squash got damaged by something (a small animal? Not sure) so I decided to make an experiment out of it and left the first one un-snipped and then snipped the other. The unsnipped one recovered and the snipped out sprouted out a new vine as you predicted.

Holy crepe plants are cool.


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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Sun Jul 21, 2013 2:45 am 
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Tea wrote:
Holy crepe plants are cool.

Hella

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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Sun Jul 21, 2013 7:35 am 
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Mars wrote:
Tea wrote:
Holy crepe plants are cool.

Hella

that's the exact reason why I switched my major from marine biology to horticulture.

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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Tue Jul 23, 2013 12:01 pm 
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Hmm I've been noticing signs of powdery mildew. I've been trimming the most affected leaves. It keeps coming back, but so far has been totally contained to one very small area in the garden. Is there anything else that can be done?

I was googling around and based one what I've read it sounds like there really isn't any way to cure it, but I've also read that it doesn't actually tend to kill the plants, just tends to result in lower quality fruit. I won't be selling any fruit I get, and most likely the only folks eating any will be my partner and I, so slightly reduced fruit quality wouldn't bug me. We go through squash fast enough that reduced storage time also wouldn't be a big deal. Should I be more worried than I am?


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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Tue Jul 23, 2013 2:45 pm 
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i would say take out what you can, when you can and then don't worry about the rest. we had powdery mildew on our squash leaves last year and i would go out once a week and trim, but it never completely went away. and we had a ton of squash and it all tasted perfectly fine to me.

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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Tue Jul 23, 2013 2:59 pm 
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Picked the first zucchini today! Also the tomatoes are going insane, I really hope they all ripen up.

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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Tue Jul 23, 2013 7:48 pm 
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the baby squashies i'm growing on my wall are growing faster than the ones on the ground. (which makes sense since that vine tends to get earlier morning sun. the neighbor's house must be blocking a little bit of sun, or deflecting some rays or something. it's fascinating.) i wonder if they're going to ripen at the same time or if the one on the ground will be delayed.

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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Wed Jul 24, 2013 10:58 am 
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nooooooooo! squash vine borers in my pumpkin stems. :-( (luckily butternuts are resistant, but still, i was excited about pie pumpkins.) wikipedia says to bury some stem along the way so i can get rooting and cut out the infected part of the stem. blergh. hope this works.

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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Sat Jul 27, 2013 3:32 pm 
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Oh no! Good luck :(

The older leaves on my squash vines are yellowing and being unhappy. Additionally, female flower buds are yellowing and dying -before- openning up, so the plants seem to be unhappy. No sign of borers, and this is on plants with no sign of mildew (yet). Any ideas?


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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Sat Jul 27, 2013 3:38 pm 
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How diligent are you with watering? I find that if I let plants get too dry for a spell, a lot of buds will yellow and die. But new ones should grow once your watering is back to normal. I find with houseplants, sometimes yellowing happens from overwatering, too. Not sure how this would be with veggies but who knows, an idea to think about. If you feel pretty confident in your watering of the plant, then it's on to someone else to try to solve that one :)

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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Sat Jul 27, 2013 3:46 pm 
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Not too confident on the watering. It was raining heavily pretty regularly for a while, so I hadn't even had to do any watering for over a month. Then a dry spell started and since I never did figure out how much to water properly (because the rain was doing it for me) I probably underwatered. I tried watering this morning... but then predictably there proceeded to be a downpour (forecast was for ~1 mm, so heavy rain was a surprise) to it may not be horribly overwatered. We'll see.


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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Sat Jul 27, 2013 9:11 pm 
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if you planted them in hills, then it'll be more difficult to overwater them.

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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Sun Jul 28, 2013 3:47 pm 
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Alas, that was one of the details we glossed over while planting.

Three of the four butternut squash plants appear to have totally recovered, so I guess it was just a matter of totally insufficient watering. Also, they weren't droopy at all after simultaneously being watered and then drenched several times over by heavy rainfall, so my idea of "too much water" is apparently way below reality. The three happy plants have lots of secondary roots while the unhappy one does not, so it might just need some extra time?


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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Sun Aug 04, 2013 11:24 pm 
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Tofulish wrote:
So we have a ton of feral cats in our yard, and I watched 4 kittens poop in my veggie patch. The bed is surrounded by chickenwire and babygates, but the tiny babies can still get through.

I imagine that the leafy veg, herbs, tomatoes and zucchini should still be fine if washed but maybe the carrots are more of a problem? I'd love some input on this - I don't want to toss all my yummy produce.

Hope this isn't too late to help: below is a post by one of the Washington State Extension Services office about cat and dog poop in veggie gardens.

It seems like this concern pops up every year. In fact, a few years ago my garden got flooded with dog waste from our neighbor (who was uphill) during a really bad rain storm. The garden was flooded for about 24 hours and then it stank like you wouldn't believe. Sludge was on everything and the black flies loved it. I called our Extension Office here in Illinois and a soil scientist suggested that he'd not eat anything from the garden that year because of the splash up that was possible from so much water pooling on the ground for some many hours. I ended up ripping out everything and building raised beds the following year to mitigate any potential future flooding.

So that experience got me to digging deeper and these are now my own guidelines (but I'm not a soil scientist):

1. If ground is contaminated and poop is not removed before rainfall, I personally would not eat the root crops or anything that can't easily and thoroughly be washed. Root crops have too many nooks and crannies to really clean well. Even if you peel them, the peeler is scraping along the surface and, well...I just can't bring myself to risk it.
2. I'd definitely not compost any vegetables that were contaminated in my compost heap since experts also warn against composting cat and dog poo.
3. If poop can be removed quickly, before it's had a chance to absorb into the soil, I'd not worry about it.

Here's that link. I hope this helps.

http://gardening.wsu.edu/stewardship/co ... etpoop.htm


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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Mon Aug 05, 2013 4:20 pm 
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So in the first week of production, we got seven zucchinis. And now in week two, we aren't getting any at all. There are plenty of flowers, but they aren't turning into anything (just seem to wither up after a few days). Is it possible they aren't getting pollinated? Is there anything I can do to encourage this?

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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Mon Aug 05, 2013 4:54 pm 
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Your zukes may be in male mode at the moment; check to see if you have any female flowers at present. The female will have a swelling/miniature zucchini right behind the blossom; the male won't. I try to give my plants a fertilizer boost after I've harvested a few fruit, and that seems to help.

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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Mon Aug 05, 2013 5:33 pm 
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Awesome, thanks for the tip!

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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Mon Aug 05, 2013 5:49 pm 
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if the female flowers are there though, and shrivelling, you can pluck off a male flower and shove it (gently) into the female flower. are the bees not around lately?

i just planted my carrots, turnips and onions. excited about this. i've never tried any of these before. i used the paper towel in a bag method. it was neat. i think next time i'll use the brown coffee filters, since i read that they're less likely to allow root penetration/damage. i used a wooden skewer to dislodge them, and they adhered to it wonderfully. (my turnips were the first to plant, and i didn't use the skewer, it was more difficult than the others)

i think the next time i use this method, depending on how these guys make out, i might not do this with root crops. or at least i'll keep a close eye on them and plant them as soon as i see a hint of a root. i didn't know how quickly it was going to happen, and so i let them grow slightly too long. this might be best for above ground crops.

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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Tue Aug 06, 2013 1:16 pm 
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How nasty is root dissolver? Like, if I put it on an evil, roundup-proof stump that keeps trying to not be killed, will it kill the tree that is about half a metre away from it?

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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Tue Aug 06, 2013 2:40 pm 
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i'm pretty sure the root dissolver stuff only works on dry wood. (the bottle i have said to wait a year after cutting the tree down.

are you using the right strength roundup? maybe you didn't drill enough holes? or maybe the holes aren't large enough? (also, are the holes just inside the bark? the heartwood isn't really alive per-se, so you'll need more roundup to get to the vascular system than if you put it just inside the bark where it'll get to work quickly.)

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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Thu Aug 08, 2013 12:32 pm 
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Talk to me about tomato rot! The bottoms of some of our romas are turning black - we had this happen last year and were told it was from over watering. Luckily it's easy enough to cut the bad spot off, but I'd really like to keep this from happening! Anyone else have this issue? I've gone down to watering only every three days.

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 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Thu Aug 08, 2013 12:42 pm 
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it's blossom end rot, and it means you don't have enough calcium. (or something is preventing the plants from taking it up.) how's your pH?

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