| Register  | FAQ  | Search | Login 
It is currently Fri Aug 01, 2014 7:05 am

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 819 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28 ... 33  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 2014 12:54 pm 
Offline
Has it on Blue Vinyl
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2010 2:31 pm
Posts: 2165
Location: Austin, TX
How do I know if my seeds are still viable?

_________________
blarg Lazy Smurf's Guide to Life
twitter @veganLazySmurf
Pinterest


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 2014 1:55 pm 
Offline
Plays The Sims 2 religiously
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2010 11:20 pm
Posts: 7166
Location: Portland, OR
coldandsleepy wrote:
Oh, ha ha, I also have a baby fir tree in a pot now from Christmas. It is growing like crazy and needs to be transplanted into a bigger container... I'd plant it in the ground but I think my landlords would be a little pissed.

I'd say definitely keep it in a pot! You know keeping them root bound isn't that bad of a thing though, they'll stay smaller that way.

_________________
i would schmear marmite on a moist scrotum for Mars. - interrobang?!
"Not everything." ~ mumbles (1973-2013) - mumbles


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 2014 2:25 pm 
Offline
Vegan Vegan Vegan Vegan Vegan
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2010 2:46 pm
Posts: 4144
Location: 5 mi east of philly
LazySmurf wrote:
How do I know if my seeds are still viable?


take a coffee filter, write in pencil the name of the seeds and date of planting, moisten it with water and a few drops of peroxide, put some seeds on it, fold over and leave for a while. (look up the usual time it takes to sprout, and check on that date, but if you don't get sprouting, leave it for another week or two to make sure it's just not delayed.

also keep in mind some seeds need a little warmth to sprout. (put those somewhat near the heater.)

you can even try to salvage those seedlings if you like. the more sturdy seedlings would be able to handle the transplant. also, if you catch the sprouting just at the beginning, those are most likely to survive. leaving them longer might be detrimental.

you can also do a slightly more passive test where you put 10 seeds in a pot and count how many of those come up.

_________________
I solved it for once and for all -- and for everyone -- by intentionally leaving behind some 9-lives burritos... ~Lorelei4mc
supercarrot.com, vegan groupony things, vegan coupons


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 2014 2:40 pm 
Offline
Has it on Blue Vinyl
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2010 2:31 pm
Posts: 2165
Location: Austin, TX
Thanks supercarrot!

_________________
blarg Lazy Smurf's Guide to Life
twitter @veganLazySmurf
Pinterest


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 2014 3:19 pm 
Offline
Vegan Vegan Vegan Vegan Vegan
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2010 2:46 pm
Posts: 4144
Location: 5 mi east of philly
(oops, i meant to say put it in a baggie and leave for a while) :-)
you're welcome.

_________________
I solved it for once and for all -- and for everyone -- by intentionally leaving behind some 9-lives burritos... ~Lorelei4mc
supercarrot.com, vegan groupony things, vegan coupons


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 2014 4:01 pm 
Offline
Drinks Wild Tofurkey
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 09, 2010 12:16 am
Posts: 2683
Location: SF Bay area
Gah! So, my weather gloating might have been premature. It's supposed to get down below freezing in the evenings this week, which is going to freak out a bunch of the temp-sensitive plants (I inherited a princess flower from a friend who moved away and I have a bunch of flowering plants). Dang it! I don't want to have to bring any inside because a lot of them are infested with fungus gnats and they'll infect my house plants.

In other news, I ordered some pole bean seeds and am going to start them inside soon. I've never grown pole beans before, so I could use some advice. I have room to grow at a minimum, 4 plants, with the option of opening up another planter for more. Do you think you can get a decent crop from 4 plants? I pretty much have ideal growing conditions this summer, e.g., mild weather, full sun, and about 12 feet for them to grow vertically.

_________________
http://hotveganchickpeas.wordpress.com (food blog)
http://baybalcony.wordpress.com (gardening blog)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 2014 4:27 pm 
Offline
Plays The Sims 2 religiously
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2010 11:20 pm
Posts: 7166
Location: Portland, OR
Your plants are on a balcony yes? Could you get some of that thick clear plastic tarp kind of thing, and tie it up around your balcony to make it like a little temporary greenhouse effect?

_________________
i would schmear marmite on a moist scrotum for Mars. - interrobang?!
"Not everything." ~ mumbles (1973-2013) - mumbles


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 2014 5:34 pm 
Offline
Drinks Wild Tofurkey
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 09, 2010 12:16 am
Posts: 2683
Location: SF Bay area
I have a blue tarp, but not clear. Will the plants die if they're covered for a few days without sun? Do I have to pin it down in any special way?

_________________
http://hotveganchickpeas.wordpress.com (food blog)
http://baybalcony.wordpress.com (gardening blog)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 2014 6:01 pm 
Offline
Married to the wolfman
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2010 9:49 pm
Posts: 5893
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
You can get CRAZY yield from 4-5 pole bean plants. I had about 9 last year and was picking 2+ lbs every other day. (I'm only doing like 3 this year!)

_________________
"Hummus; a gentleman's vice." -- Mars

coldandsleepy cooks, THE BLOG!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 2014 6:02 pm 
Offline
Married to the wolfman
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2010 9:49 pm
Posts: 5893
Location: Santa Cruz, CA
Nevermind! I can't read apparently.

_________________
"Hummus; a gentleman's vice." -- Mars

coldandsleepy cooks, THE BLOG!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 2014 6:10 pm 
Offline
Because Bob Barker Told Me To
User avatar

Joined: Mon Oct 25, 2010 6:08 pm
Posts: 919
Location: PDX
couroupita wrote:
I have a blue tarp, but not clear. Will the plants die if they're covered for a few days without sun? Do I have to pin it down in any special way?

Covering for a few days, or even longer, isn't a problem. If you can group all your pots onto the floor of your balcony, along the house wall, that will help keep some heat in too. Tuck the tarp ends under pots along the outer edge, and if you have some bubble wrap or something to wrap around the actual pots that would help too. Roots in pots are more sensitive to freezing than the leaves/stems.

Going back to carrots, I think the energy from replanting them may go to flowering/seed at this point, since carrots are biennials, and the roots get awfully tough once flowering starts. You might have better success with celery or scallions producing edible green growth before bolting.

_________________
Formerly Kaleicious. I still love kale, but no more than lots of other garden greens too! Orach is currently my favorite.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Mon Feb 03, 2014 6:32 pm 
Offline
Vegan Vegan Vegan Vegan Vegan
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2010 2:46 pm
Posts: 4144
Location: 5 mi east of philly
good point, jill. (but that's okay too, since carrot flowers attract beneficials, and then she can harvest the seeds to plant later.)

as for protecting potted plants from freezing weather, make sure you water them well, since frozen water can only go down to 32, and that protects the roots with a blanket of 32 degrees. if there isn't any water in the soil to freeze, then the roots can be affected even worse by the colder surrounding air spaces.

_________________
I solved it for once and for all -- and for everyone -- by intentionally leaving behind some 9-lives burritos... ~Lorelei4mc
supercarrot.com, vegan groupony things, vegan coupons


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Tue Feb 04, 2014 5:28 am 
Offline
Seagull of the PPK
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 19, 2010 6:46 pm
Posts: 7717
Location: Brasil
if the frost is only at night, you can cover the plants with buckets or things. i do that with plastic cups when i have small plants in the ground and we have frost warnings here. it's like a cloche.

supercarrot, why the peroxide in the water? (i have been testing my old seeds- so many of them are duds!)

_________________
Buddha says 'Meh'.--matwinser
I'm just a drunk who likes fruit. -- Desdemona


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Tue Feb 04, 2014 7:48 am 
Offline
Vegan Vegan Vegan Vegan Vegan
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2010 2:46 pm
Posts: 4144
Location: 5 mi east of philly
to kill fungus spores.

i went on a stupidly large spree to rareseeds.com in 2008, and then lost track of them in my basement, only finding them last year. luckily the kale was still good. gonna test some others early this year. it took waaaaaaay long for my peppers and tomatoes to sprout. so sad.

_________________
I solved it for once and for all -- and for everyone -- by intentionally leaving behind some 9-lives burritos... ~Lorelei4mc
supercarrot.com, vegan groupony things, vegan coupons


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Mon Feb 10, 2014 10:02 pm 
Offline
Drinks Wild Tofurkey
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 09, 2010 12:16 am
Posts: 2683
Location: SF Bay area
Thanks for all the help, everyone! We covered up and made it through the cold spell! I don't think anyone went into shock!

_________________
http://hotveganchickpeas.wordpress.com (food blog)
http://baybalcony.wordpress.com (gardening blog)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Thu Feb 13, 2014 12:18 am 
Offline
Drinks Wild Tofurkey
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 09, 2010 12:16 am
Posts: 2683
Location: SF Bay area
I have a question about stunted plants. I grew way too many kale and chard in my planter and they're pretty small now that their roots have spread. I'm making a lettuce tower this weekend and thought about transplanting the stunted plants to that. Do you think they'll come back or are they kaput?

_________________
http://hotveganchickpeas.wordpress.com (food blog)
http://baybalcony.wordpress.com (gardening blog)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Sat Feb 22, 2014 11:43 am 
Offline
Chip Strong
User avatar

Joined: Tue Feb 26, 2013 9:14 am
Posts: 972
Location: Edinburgh, Scotland
Yesterday I found some carrots growing in a pot in the garden that I'd totally forgotten about! I planted the seeds last year and then totally ignored them all winter, only to find some growing :) I picked a few for the dinner table and rearranged the baby carrots still growing in the pot.

Image

Image

_________________
My blog about travel, campaigning, activism, vegan food and stuff.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Sun Feb 23, 2014 1:05 pm 
Offline
Because Bob Barker Told Me To
User avatar

Joined: Mon Oct 25, 2010 6:08 pm
Posts: 919
Location: PDX
couroupita wrote:
I have a question about stunted plants. I grew way too many kale and chard in my planter and they're pretty small now that their roots have spread. I'm making a lettuce tower this weekend and thought about transplanting the stunted plants to that. Do you think they'll come back or are they kaput?

It might be faster to start with fresh seeds if you have them, but the stunted plants should come back too. There's generally a pot or two of kale starts I don't get around to transplanting (and celery too!) that I try to salvage months late, and they do okay. I have an unheated greenhouse that now has celery and kale about ready to start harvesting (from stunted plants transplanted in November.) Meanwhile the weather was so harsh outside, I'm not sure if my late summer planted kale will produce anything this spring or not.

_________________
Formerly Kaleicious. I still love kale, but no more than lots of other garden greens too! Orach is currently my favorite.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Mon Feb 24, 2014 7:24 am 
Offline
Seagull of the PPK
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 19, 2010 6:46 pm
Posts: 7717
Location: Brasil
It is raining again. I want to go out and play in the garden. Ugh.
I just planted nappa cabbage, a strange red-veined lettuce, normal red lettuce, scallions.... a few dino kales that were getting too big for the flat where i started them.... and I have a whole bunch of things starting, including thai basil, several kales, sesame, and some mystery seeds (they look like chia but.... rounder than chia? i have no idea what they are.)
This year I'm having a rash of volunteer squash. They are everywhere and they are super resilient. I'm keeping them.

And finally, I had a complete revelation. We don't get northern hemisphere type spinach here, it's too hot. Maybe once a year in early spring, if you have Japanese-Brazilian connections, you might be able to get a meal's worth. I try to plant it every year and nothin'. We get aussie or malabar spinach, but it's just not the same.
I've been growing a type of taro plant (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xanthosoma_sagittifolium ) only because before our house was built the people next door used the land for a garden, and we can't kill these taro they planted no matter how hard we try. The tiniest bit of the rhizome makes a whole new plant come back, and the tubers are so small that they aren't worth the effort. plus the leaves are huge. So as I clean out the garden I try to get rid of them. My husband told me the old lady next door asked for them if we had any dug up (it was her garden before). So I dug some out and gave them to her and she told me they grow them for the LEAVES, not the tuber. I was amazed, so this weekend I harvested some and cooked them up the way she suggested. They taste JUST like real spinach when they're cooked. I was thrilled. We will keep them on the edge of the garden (they take up a lot of space). And I did a bit of research and they are a real heritage food- most people in this part of the country have never heard of these leaves, but they have kept people from starving farther north, and are what people who move down south pine for.

_________________
Buddha says 'Meh'.--matwinser
I'm just a drunk who likes fruit. -- Desdemona


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Mon Feb 24, 2014 10:21 am 
Offline
Vegan Vegan Vegan Vegan Vegan
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2010 2:46 pm
Posts: 4144
Location: 5 mi east of philly
cool! i was thinking about what i would do if an apocalypse happened, and i know i would start jerusalem artichoke stands in the front yards of neighbors houses if they're abandoned. :-)

i wonder if that taro would make it in zone 7. (the google machine says zone 8, but i could totally rig together some sort of cold frame from shower/storm doors.)

_________________
I solved it for once and for all -- and for everyone -- by intentionally leaving behind some 9-lives burritos... ~Lorelei4mc
supercarrot.com, vegan groupony things, vegan coupons


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Mon Feb 24, 2014 10:48 am 
Offline
Seagull of the PPK
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 19, 2010 6:46 pm
Posts: 7717
Location: Brasil
when we were up in the US we had a few times when shopping could not be done in a timely manner to buy vegetables, and I thought I would be all awesome and just "go foraging". i think all i could find was half a spoonful of chickweed and maybe some plantain. Total failure for apocalypse!!!!

re the plant, this indicates maybe. http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/2218/#b . you can trawl for info for growing malanga or yautia (both names under which the plant masquerades). not sure how reliable the info is though because half of what i read indicates it is horrid poisonous, which seems to be confusion with another yam type plant. i was taught here that you can tell this plant is edible (compared with the poisonous one) because the "cut" in the leaf goes all the way to the stem, unlike in the poisonous one. nevertheless, the plant has a nasty latex and i would not eat it raw.

_________________
Buddha says 'Meh'.--matwinser
I'm just a drunk who likes fruit. -- Desdemona


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Mon Feb 24, 2014 11:06 am 
Offline
Vegan Vegan Vegan Vegan Vegan
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2010 2:46 pm
Posts: 4144
Location: 5 mi east of philly
thanks for the tips. :-)

the only edible weeds that grow readily in my garden are also full of oxalates. (go figure, eh?)

_________________
I solved it for once and for all -- and for everyone -- by intentionally leaving behind some 9-lives burritos... ~Lorelei4mc
supercarrot.com, vegan groupony things, vegan coupons


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Mon Feb 24, 2014 4:15 pm 
Offline
Drinks Wild Tofurkey
User avatar

Joined: Tue Nov 09, 2010 12:16 am
Posts: 2683
Location: SF Bay area
Beautiful carrots, imogen!

I'm starting to grow native plants on my balcony to attract wildlife but in the process I've learned about lots of edibles! Yarrow is supposed to be tasty and luckily mine is growing like mad. Unfortunately, so many ecosystems in CA have been destroyed and we're left with these totally useless urban landscapes covered in ivy, iceplant, and european grasses. >:-/

_________________
http://hotveganchickpeas.wordpress.com (food blog)
http://baybalcony.wordpress.com (gardening blog)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Mon Feb 24, 2014 7:01 pm 
Offline
Because Bob Barker Told Me To
User avatar

Joined: Mon Oct 25, 2010 6:08 pm
Posts: 919
Location: PDX
! Isa mentions the leaves of a taro plant that she used to get in New York - she called it callaloo. It's referenced in IDI, with the Jerk Sloppy Joes recipe. She can't find it in Omaha so is using spinach instead.

Just this morning for the first time I harvested one of my most common weeds, Bittercress (Cardamine oligosperma,) and used in a chickpea pancake. It gets pretty big and juicy when grown in fertile garden beds, so would be a great apocalypse food, and isn't bitter when young. I also routinely harvest Sow Thistle (Sonchus oleraceus) - a member of the Aster family, and cook it like spinach. Not as good as greens I grow on purpose, but I can harvest it by the truckload by mid-March, when pickings are pretty slim otherwise. I've also let Lambsquarters self-sow around a bit, but I like the more cultivated forms like Magentaspreen better. I have a lot of other apparently edible, nutritious weeds around too, but nothing that has passed my taste test.

_________________
Formerly Kaleicious. I still love kale, but no more than lots of other garden greens too! Orach is currently my favorite.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Garden Chat
PostPosted: Mon Feb 24, 2014 7:11 pm 
Offline
Seagull of the PPK
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 19, 2010 6:46 pm
Posts: 7717
Location: Brasil
Wha! It seems that callaloo can be the same plant, or a variant, or amaranth! who knew? I was told to boil it first, then rinse and squeeze, and then use it however I want to. It looks though that I could cook it up into a shlerpy type stew. Awesome.

We also have Sow Thistle! I never knew the English name before. It grows on the side of the road (and in my yard) and my mother in law will pick great bouquets of it when she comes to visit and walks from place to place. She always tells me that when she was a girl it was a staple of their diet. I pick the flower heads for the bird to demolish, he loves it.

_________________
Buddha says 'Meh'.--matwinser
I'm just a drunk who likes fruit. -- Desdemona


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 819 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28 ... 33  Next

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group
Template made by DEVPPL/ThatBigForum and fancied up by What Cheer