| Register  | FAQ  | Search | Login 
It is currently Tue Jul 22, 2014 8:51 pm

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 12 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Starters for n00bs
PostPosted: Fri Mar 15, 2013 10:47 am 
Offline
Venomous Head of Veganism
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 19, 2010 2:21 pm
Posts: 8585
OK so this is my first year trying to make my own starters indoors. Here's my problem. My best sun is in the front of the house. But the entire front is an enclosed porch. The porch is plenty warm during the day, but at night it gets cold.

SO!

Will I have to bring all of my starters in at night? Let's say it gets down in the 30s and 40s at night?

Did I just answer my own question?

I guess if other people have questions they can ask them here, too.

_________________
"You guys are a little bit fast to identify as not-mumbles. " ~ mumbles


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Starters for n00bs
PostPosted: Fri Mar 15, 2013 10:52 am 
Offline
Invented Vegan Meringue
User avatar

Joined: Thu Nov 01, 2012 2:55 pm
Posts: 3686
Location: The land of maple syrup and beavers.
My problem with trying starters is that I don't get really good sunlight anywhere in my house. I keep thinking I should go buy seeds and then remember I've got nowhere to put them.

_________________
Anyone for some German Shepherd Pie? - daisychain
Well! Fruit is stupid! These onions taste nothing like fruit! - allularpunk
Dwarf-tossing for God: A Story of Hope - Invictus


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Starters for n00bs
PostPosted: Fri Mar 15, 2013 11:29 am 
Offline
Invented Vegan Meringue
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2010 2:46 pm
Posts: 4094
Location: 5 mi east of philly
you can put them on a heating pad on a timer that goes on when it gets chilly.

_________________
I solved it for once and for all -- and for everyone -- by intentionally leaving behind some 9-lives burritos... ~Lorelei4mc
supercarrot.com, vegan groupony things, vegan coupons


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Starters for n00bs
PostPosted: Fri Mar 15, 2013 7:50 pm 
Offline
Making Threats to Punks Again
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 21, 2010 12:10 am
Posts: 1102
Location: Melbourne, Australia
I've never had a problem with cold but yes a heating pad I think would be the ideal solution. Seeds are fun!

_________________
'forking. bogan as forking fork' - Joshua
'I can puke and be naked anywhere I want' - Fee


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Starters for n00bs
PostPosted: Sun Mar 31, 2013 8:25 pm 
Offline
Banned from Vegan Freaks.
User avatar

Joined: Fri Oct 22, 2010 9:03 pm
Posts: 356
My mother in law, an avid gardener, has the same problem re sun, and she uses heating pads with hers. Works beautifully.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Starters for n00bs
PostPosted: Thu Apr 04, 2013 2:07 pm 
Offline
Because Bob Barker Told Me To
User avatar

Joined: Mon Oct 25, 2010 6:08 pm
Posts: 911
Location: PDX
You'd do fine with cool loving crops - lettuce, cabbage family, etc. But you would need a heating pad or else bring in warm loving crops like tomatoes, cukes, etc.

_________________
Formerly Kaleicious. I still love kale, but no more than lots of other garden greens too! Orach is currently my favorite.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Starters for n00bs
PostPosted: Fri May 31, 2013 1:13 am 
Offline
Tofu Pup

Joined: Fri May 31, 2013 12:57 am
Posts: 2
Starters! This subject will get me going for a quick rant. Three things I've learned seed starting:

1) Test your seeds if they are older! (10 or 20 seeds in between sheets of toilet paper or papertowel, wet, preferably in a window sill) Then you can get your percentage ratio for germination!
2) plant MORE than you need for you garden, then gift to neighbors or friends. I planted just what I needed, then nearly sobbed when my lush little zucchini plant snapped off when I was carelessly moving it. :( I unfortunately had a couple other tragedies, but lots of success as well!)
3) Make sure you start early enough, some varieties grow slow, and some grow really quickly, so knowing your plants germination time helps quite a bit. I live in zone 3b with a short growing season, so my little tomato plants I started indoors were started too late! I will be lucky to see some flowers never mind fruit by the end of the season!

I am really interested in learning to seed save, but how on earth to you save seeds from carrots or beets? etc?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Starters for n00bs
PostPosted: Fri May 31, 2013 7:32 am 
Offline
Invented Vegan Meringue
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2010 2:46 pm
Posts: 4094
Location: 5 mi east of philly
wait until they flower, put a fabric baggie around it and wait. when it starts to dry up, cut it off and massage it til it breaks apart. easy peasy. (they're biennials, so it'll happen next year.)

_________________
I solved it for once and for all -- and for everyone -- by intentionally leaving behind some 9-lives burritos... ~Lorelei4mc
supercarrot.com, vegan groupony things, vegan coupons


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Starters for n00bs
PostPosted: Sat Jun 01, 2013 12:18 am 
Offline
Tofu Pup

Joined: Fri May 31, 2013 12:57 am
Posts: 2
Awesome tip, thanks! Okay...so "biennials, it'll happen next year" Please explain! I don't get the biennial thing yet. Annuals & perennials I get!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Starters for n00bs
PostPosted: Sun Jun 02, 2013 5:23 pm 
Offline
Should Write a Goddam Book Already
User avatar

Joined: Sat Dec 04, 2010 7:32 pm
Posts: 1008
Location: Michigan
I started most of my plants this end of feb. which was perfect timing for eggplants and peppers, tomatoes should wait till later in the year like mid march maybe. Before that the winter sun is weak, so even if you have a sunny window it may not be enough and your seedlings will be all tangled together and stunted. They do need their dirt kept warm to germinate. An electric blanket covering a table on a timer works well, and is what I used this year, but didnt use heat mats last year and I can see a big improvement with the heat. If your plants are ready to be hardened off before putting in the garden, yes, you need to bring them in no matter what the temperature for the first week or so that they have been outside during the day. Then you can start leaving them out at night unless its in the 30-40 F degrees. Hardening them off is important to get them used to sun and wind as well.

Nightshades and brassicas are really the only things you need to start inside anyway, since cucumbers, melons, squash, lettuce, greens, herbs, etc. come up so fast and do better starting them outside in spring.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Starters for n00bs
PostPosted: Thu Jun 06, 2013 7:03 pm 
Offline
Venomous Head of Veganism
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 19, 2010 2:21 pm
Posts: 8585
Anyway, my starters didn't really work. Well, the tomatoes sprouted, but still, months later they are only a few inches tall. I went out and bought started tomatoes so all is well.

_________________
"You guys are a little bit fast to identify as not-mumbles. " ~ mumbles


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Starters for n00bs
PostPosted: Tue Jun 11, 2013 4:13 pm 
Offline
Should Write a Goddam Book Already
User avatar

Joined: Sat Dec 04, 2010 7:32 pm
Posts: 1008
Location: Michigan
You may still want to plant those that didn't work out in some other area and let them grow. Not in a prime garden location, but throw them in your flower bed or compost or something. Lots of mine that didn't work from last year, like 3 in. tall tomatoes in june, I threw in the woods, and they were producing without any care or planting or anything by september, so you never know. Tomatoes catch up fast when they're outside with light and soil. Also, if you live in a low humidity area, you should not try to start anything in those paper or cardboard compostable things, you need to use the divided plastic trays. Side by side testing done my me this year reveals, that in plastic, 80% success vs. 30% paper. Also in the paper ones, i still have plants I planted the same time as the plastic ones that are a few inches tall, while their counterparts in the plastic divided 6-pack things are half a foot and in the ground planted. Plus, plastic ones are reusable so cheaper next year.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 12 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group
Template made by DEVPPL/ThatBigForum and fancied up by What Cheer