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 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Fri Oct 18, 2013 9:07 pm 
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I just finished A Prayer For Owen Meany. Really good. Thanks to those who recommended it.


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 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Sat Oct 19, 2013 8:05 am 
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emmalv wrote:
I just finished A Prayer For Owen Meany. Really good. Thanks to those who recommended it.


Seconded! I read it a few weeks ago after reading about it in this thread and I really enjoyed it as well.

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 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Sat Oct 19, 2013 1:04 pm 
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I finished The Sisters Brothers the other night. It was OK. It annoyed me with its lack of contractions. I hate when writers do that.

I started on The Crimes of Paris, but I think I might put that off to read for this Coursera course I'm doing. It's about fantasy and sci-fi. The book(s) for this week are Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass. I've already read the first, but I'll re-read to know what's going on and then read the 2nd.

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 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Sun Oct 20, 2013 5:21 am 
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Getting pretty bored by The Tin Drum. I feel like there's a whole layer of symbolism that I'm completely missing, making the book a bit pointless.


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 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Sun Oct 20, 2013 6:56 am 
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I've been reading The Ringmaster's Daughter by Jostein Gaarder. Not sure what I think about it yet, but I'm interested enough to plug on.

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 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Sun Oct 20, 2013 8:00 am 
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I'm reading a book of interviews by one german music journalist. It's a bit too hypermasculine but mostly the interviews are pretty interesting. and I know feel like I got an even better basis for disliking Mick Jagger and liking Paul McCartney and not feeling sure about Ray Davies. A lot of the talk about the origins of rock'n'roll go over my head but it really just make me think it's finally time to dive into the music of the 50s and beyond. I mean, I had my 00s, 90s, 80s, 70s, 60s phases, where is the rest?!

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 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Sun Oct 20, 2013 8:24 am 
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Loyalty in Death, the next JD Robb book in the series.

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 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Sun Oct 20, 2013 10:09 am 
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rachell37 wrote:
I finished The Sisters Brothers the other night. It was OK. It annoyed me with its lack of contractions. I hate when writers do that.

Do you mean he wrote "I am" instead of "I'm" and "is not" instead of "isn't". Or just excluded the ' from his writing? I.e., Im, isnt....

I just ask because there's this trend seeping into Canadian writing over the last few years of leaving out punctuation type markers (i.e. no quotes around dialogue, etc.) I roll my eyes at this sort of thing, personally, because I see punctuation as a guide for the reader to help them best understand what the hell a writer means. (I'm with Kurt Vonnegut who says that readers need all the help they can get from writers). Also, dialogue gets confusing unpunctuated. I mean, I can generally follow it but I imagine some readers have trouble. I don't object to leaving it out it too strongly--I mean, writers can do whatever the hell they want with their work, but I think as a writer part of the job is to help enable a reader to understand what you're writing and help them follow it and this sort of goes against that... One of my workshop teachers objected to, for example, italicizing words because he felt that the writer was trying too hard to control a reader's experience, which is an interesting argument that I don't really have an answer to if someone sees it as a controlling feature. I don't see it as such, but as an assist to help comprehend a writer's intention. I'm not like, all, Imma italicize this word because they must see it MY WAY. It's just to emphasize a particular word in a sentence because when I read that line in my head, it's best emphasized, again to enable comprehension. Anyhoo...

I've heard folks object that punctuation marks are "visually distracting" which I don't cotton to because prose/writing isn't really a visual art and a typewritten page of text is a typewritten page of text to me--it's the style and ideas within the text that matter to me. Sometimes not honoring punctuation and the general rules of sentence structure (like a capital letter to begin each new sentence, etc.) serves a purpose, I suppose, in terms of the theme of a piece to ignore punctuation or lower case everything as stylistic distinguishing feature in all their work (i.e., ee cummings) but I see it used pretty frequently where clearly it's contributing nothing to the theme or distinction and otherwise serves no purpose and is just following that trend.

Sisters Brothers won awards though so I figure it's a good book. Haven't read it myself though. I am sadly reading nothing right now. *sad face*

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 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Sun Oct 20, 2013 10:22 am 
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seitanicverses wrote:
rachell37 wrote:
I finished The Sisters Brothers the other night. It was OK. It annoyed me with its lack of contractions. I hate when writers do that.

Do you mean he wrote "I am" instead of "I'm" and "is not" instead of "isn't". Or just excluded the ' from his writing? I.e., Im, isnt....

I just ask because there's this trend seeping into Canadian writing over the last few years of leaving out punctuation type markers (i.e. no quotes around dialogue, etc.) I roll my eyes at this sort of thing, personally, because I see punctuation as a guide for the reader to help them best understand what the hell a writer means. (I'm with Kurt Vonnegut who says that readers need all the help they can get from writers). Also, dialogue gets confusing unpunctuated. I mean, I can generally follow it but I imagine some readers have trouble. I don't object to leaving it out it too strongly--I mean, writers can do whatever the hell they want with their work, but I think as a writer part of the job is to help enable a reader to understand what you're writing and help them follow it and this sort of goes against that... One of my workshop teachers objected to, for example, italicizing words because he felt that the writer was trying too hard to control a reader's experience, which is an interesting argument that I don't really have an answer to if someone sees it as a controlling feature. I don't see it as such, but as an assist to help comprehend a writer's intention. I'm not like, all, Imma italicize this word because they must see it MY WAY. It's just to emphasize a particular word in a sentence because when I read that line in my head, it's best emphasized, again to enable comprehension. Anyhoo...

I've heard folks object that punctuation marks are "visually distracting" which I don't cotton to because prose/writing isn't really a visual art and a typewritten page of text is a typewritten page of text to me--it's the style and ideas within the text that matter to me. Sometimes not honoring punctuation and the general rules of sentence structure (like a capital letter to begin each new sentence, etc.) serves a purpose, I suppose, in terms of the theme of a piece to ignore punctuation or lower case everything as stylistic distinguishing feature in all their work (i.e., ee cummings) but I see it used pretty frequently where clearly it's contributing nothing to the theme or distinction and otherwise serves no purpose and is just following that trend.

Sisters Brothers won awards though so I figure it's a good book. Haven't read it myself though. I am sadly reading nothing right now. *sad face*

No contractions as in "I am" instead of "I'm", etc.

Cormac McCarthy does the no punctuation thing. Well, he punctuates his contractions, but he doesn't, for instance, use quotation marks to indicate speech. It threw me the first time I read his stuff, but I've since gotten used to it because he's such an amazing writer. But I generally disagree with the practice because it does make reading more difficult; I think it's more distracting to have to re-read a passage because you didn't realise it was speech.

Of course, right now I'm reading Alice in Wonderland, and it seems to have too much punctuation (e.g., "can't" written as "ca'n't"). I don't know if that's the transposition (I'm reading it on the Kindle) or just the way Lewis Carroll wrote it.

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 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Sun Oct 20, 2013 10:52 am 
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rachell37 wrote:
Of course, right now I'm reading Alice in Wonderland, and it seems to have too much punctuation (e.g., "can't" written as "ca'n't"). I don't know if that's the transposition (I'm reading it on the Kindle) or just the way Lewis Carroll wrote it.

I know when I read Gulliver's Travels Swift Capitalized a lot of Words in Sentences which I'm not sure of the Purpose of (I think it's called Title Case rather than Sentence Case today--what he was doing), but was just a stylistic feature of the time he was writing in or how the written language happened to be evolving at the time he was writing. But yeah, sometimes you see eccentric punctuation or stylistic features in older writings as well that you don't see today like what you're seeing in Carroll's AiW. Perhaps modern English is being pared down and evolving to a less punctuated beast and the punctuation eschewers are setting that trend!

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 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Sun Oct 20, 2013 3:03 pm 
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Finished Insurgent 5 minutes ago (just in time for Alegiant) and loved every darn word, it was better than Divergent.
I won a book on Goodreads - Stay where you are and then leave by John Boyne ( who wrote The boy in striped pyjamas). I might read that whilst waiting for Alegiant.

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 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Sun Oct 20, 2013 5:23 pm 
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seitanicverses wrote:
I know when I read Gulliver's Travels Swift Capitalized a lot of Words in Sentences which I'm not sure of the Purpose of (I think it's called Title Case rather than Sentence Case today--what he was doing), but was just a stylistic feature of the time he was writing in or how the written language happened to be evolving at the time he was writing. But yeah, sometimes you see eccentric punctuation or stylistic features in older writings as well that you don't see today like what you're seeing in Carroll's AiW. Perhaps modern English is being pared down and evolving to a less punctuated beast and the punctuation eschewers are setting that trend!

I do believe it is a Holdover from Antiquated European Language Styles which continues into Certain Languages I work with which shall remain Unnamed. It is the Bane of my existence and I thank Whomever Deserves My Thanks for shift+F3.

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 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Mon Oct 21, 2013 8:45 pm 
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Now I'm about two thirds of the way through Wives and Daughters by Elizabeth Gaskell because I love me some 19th century chick lit.

I've just started the audio book, I like it so far :)

I really liked it, though I forgot about the fate of the author and how that would affect the ending. That really caught me off guard, but I should have remembered. North and South will remain my favorite of hers.

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 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Mon Oct 21, 2013 11:35 pm 
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I'm reading Stephen Reid's A Crowbar in the Buddhist Garden and it is chilling and tragic and just really quite amazing.


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 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2013 4:23 am 
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The Little Village School by Gervase Phinn

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 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2013 6:40 am 
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I just finished Going Clear and it was most interesting, so much of it was almost unbelievable. really liked the writing style. i've been reading nearly all nonfiction lately and the last 4 books, maybe, i have done a quick skim and then said, "nope", which is not like me but who has the time to read something that doesn't move you? But this one was quite good. Have to look at the other books that author has written.

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 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2013 9:39 am 
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I've nearly finished Jan Karski's (autobiographical) Story of a Secret State and it was really good but devastatingly realistic and descriptive in its description of life in occupied Poland, and particularly the Warsaw Ghetto. Very fast I got used to the fact that any time he mentions someone by their real name rather than a code name, they've almost certainly died because of their involvement with the Polish underground! Fascinating, and a part of WWII history I knew nothing about before I read it. I think I need to read something a bit cheerier next though!

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 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2013 10:21 am 
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I decided to read Wicked after all, and I'm liking it. I was such a Wizard of Oz fanatic as a kid, it's neat to see some made-up backstory for a character you really know very little about.

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 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2013 11:15 am 
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I have been really enjoying Stories for Nighttime and Some for the Day by Ben Loory. I haven't read anything I liked so much in a while. They are all super short surrealist stories about UFOs, Moose, Trees that can walk around, a house that falls in love with the sea, and all sorts of other random things. Here is one called The TV.

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 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2013 11:16 am 
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LazySmurf wrote:
I have been really enjoying Stories for Nighttime and Some for the Day by Ben Loory. I haven't read anything I liked so much in a while. They are all super short surrealist stories about UFOs, Moose, Trees that can walk around, a house that falls in love with the sea, and all sorts of other random things. Here is one called The TV.


This sounds like something I would love!

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 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2013 11:19 am 
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allularpunk wrote:
LazySmurf wrote:
I have been really enjoying Stories for Nighttime and Some for the Day by Ben Loory. I haven't read anything I liked so much in a while. They are all super short surrealist stories about UFOs, Moose, Trees that can walk around, a house that falls in love with the sea, and all sorts of other random things. Here is one called The TV.


This sounds like something I would love!

I found it because of the story about the Moose on This American Life, here it is if you want to listen!
http://www.thisamericanlife.org/radio-a ... o-do?act=3

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 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2013 11:40 am 
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LazySmurf wrote:
allularpunk wrote:
LazySmurf wrote:
I have been really enjoying Stories for Nighttime and Some for the Day by Ben Loory. I haven't read anything I liked so much in a while. They are all super short surrealist stories about UFOs, Moose, Trees that can walk around, a house that falls in love with the sea, and all sorts of other random things. Here is one called The TV.


This sounds like something I would love!

I found it because of the story about the Moose on This American Life, here it is if you want to listen!
http://www.thisamericanlife.org/radio-a ... o-do?act=3


That was fantastic. Thank you.

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 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2013 12:43 pm 
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I finished Looking for Alaska last night. I didn't like it. It was an easy, addictive read, but I was not a fan of much else.

Still working through The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes between books, and will probably try to finish Moby Duck: The True Story of 28,000 Bath Toys Lost at Sea

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 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2013 1:10 pm 
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LazySmurf wrote:
I have been really enjoying Stories for Nighttime and Some for the Day by Ben Loory. I haven't read anything I liked so much in a while. They are all super short surrealist stories about UFOs, Moose, Trees that can walk around, a house that falls in love with the sea, and all sorts of other random things. Here is one called The TV.

I really enjoyed that story!

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 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2013 2:55 pm 
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