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 Post subject: Zen Habits' Guide to Eating Plant Based Diet
PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2012 6:58 am 
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Seagull of the PPK
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(disclosure: i follow this site and associated bloggers)
Leo posted this today http://zenhabits.net/plants/
It seems extraordinarily neutral, well written and inclusive. His FAQs and references might serve as resources and talking points for any one of us (with one or two exceptions that jumped out at me as soon as i posted it- but he's not coming from an animal welfare perspective, and i'll forgive him that).


Quote:
Frequently Asked Questions

I’ll add to this section as questions come in, though obviously I can’t answer everything.

Q: Isn’t it hard to get protein on a vegan diet?

A: Not really, as long as you eat a variety of whole foods, and not a bunch of processed flours and sugars (the white kind that has little nutrition). There is protein in vegetables and grains, and even more in beans, nuts and seeds. I often eat protein-rich plant foods like tempeh, tofu, seitan, edamame, black beans, lentils, quinoa, soymilk, and raw nuts. Read more here.

Q: What about calcium or iron or B12?

A: Again, it’s not difficult at all. I’ve calculated the iron and calcium in my diet at various times, and as long as I’m mostly eating whole foods, it’s really easy. Nuts and green veggies are your best friends, but there’s also calcium-fortified soymilk and tofu and the like. Eat some kale, quinoa, raw nuts, various seeds, broccoli, tofu or tempeh … it’s not difficult. Vitamin B12 is a bit more difficult to get from regular plants, as the main source of B12 is usually animal products — including eggs and dairy. But actually, vegans have figured this out, and now if you drink fortified soymilk or almond milk, or use nutritional yeast or a few other good sources like that, you will have no worries. More reading on iron, calcium and B12 for vegans.

Q: Isn’t soy bad for you?

A: No. That’s a myth. I would stick to organic, non-GMO soy, but actually soy is a very healthy source of protein and other nutrients, and has been eaten by very healthy people for thousands of years. More info here.

Q: I follow the Paleo diet and believe this is how humans are meant to eat.

A: Well, if you’re eating unprocessed foods and have cut out white flours and sugars and deep-fried foods, you’re probably healthier than the average American. I admire the Paleo crowd that focuses on whole foods and that eats lots of veggies and nuts and seeds, but when it’s just an excuse to eat lots of meat, it’s not as healthy. It’s also not true that hunter-gatherer societies ate mostly meat — the crowd that believes this has made a flawed review of contemporary hunter-gatherers. Most traditional societies eat, and have pretty much always eaten, mostly plants, including lots of starches — respected anthropologists such as Nathanial Dominy, PhD, from Dartmouth College say that the idea of hunter-gatherers eating mostly meat is a myth. I’d also warn against low-carb, high-protein diets over the long run — in the short term, you’ll see weight loss, but in the long run they’ve been shown to increase cardiovascular disease (from June 21, 2012 issue of British Medical Journal).

Q: It sounds difficult and complicated.

A: Actually it’s very simple — you just learn to eat a variety of plants. It does mean learning some new meals, but instead of seeing that as a hardship, think of it as something fun to learn. If you slowly change your eating patterns, it’s not hard at all. Be flexible and don’t be too strict — you’ll find that it’s much easier if you allow yourself an occasional meal with animal products, especially in the first 6-12 months.

Q: What about fake meats and cheeses?

A: There’s nothing wrong with giving them a try now and then when you’re having a craving for something, but in all honesty you don’t need them. They’re more expensive and less healthy. Basically, they’re convenience foods.

Q: What if I’m allergic to soy or gluten or nuts?

A: It’s still possible to get all the nutrition you need from a plant-based diets without a specific kind of food (like gluten or soy), from what I understand. More here.

Q: It sounds expensive.

A: Actually it can be a lot less expensive, if you stay away from the vegan convenience foods (which are fine on occasion). Meat is more expensive than beans or tofu, for example. While fresh, organic veggies can cost a bit, you should get these in your diet even if you eat meat — and in the long run, you’ll save much more on medical bills.

Q: There’s no way I’ll give up (eggs, cheese, ice cream, etc.)!

A: Well, you don’t have to. If you want to eat mostly plants but also eggs and cheese, that’s much better than eating meat. But there are cheese substitutes you can try, and vegan ice cream, and in the long run, you might find that giving these things up isn’t as difficult as you think.

Q: What about eating out at restaurants or social gatherings?

A: I’d recommend you take it slowly at first, and eat mostly plants at home, and be more liberal when you eat out, for a little while. You don’t want to make this too difficult on yourself. But actually, once you learn some simple strategies, it’s not that hard to find vegan food in restaurants — some are easier than others, and sites like Happy Cow make it easy to find veg-friendly restaurants in your area. As for eating at friends’ and families’ houses, I’ve learned to offer to bring one or two vegan dishes, and it’s not usually a problem.

Q: What if my family and friends don’t support this change?

A: It’s best if you don’t start preaching — people don’t like it. This article might seem like a violation of that, but actually I rarely push veganism on this site, and when I do it’s only as a way to show others a healthy and compassionate alternative. Remember that those around you probably don’t know much about veganism, and are likely to react defensively. Take the opportunity, when they bring up the topic, to share what you’re learning, and the concerns you yourself had when you first learned about it. Show them some great vegan food. Share this guide with them. And always be patient.

More answers here: Vegan Outreach Q&A, Vegan Nutrition FAQ, Vegan Society FAQ.

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 Post subject: Re: Zen Habits' Guide to Eating Plant Based Diet
PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2012 7:41 am 
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Saggy Butt
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<3 zen habits


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 Post subject: Re: Zen Habits' Guide to Eating Plant Based Diet
PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2012 6:35 pm 
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Quote:
A: There’s nothing wrong with giving them a try now and then when you’re having a craving for something, but in all honesty you don’t need them. They’re more expensive and less healthy. Basically, they’re convenience foods.


And we wouldn't want things to get too, you know, convenient.

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 Post subject: Re: Zen Habits' Guide to Eating Plant Based Diet
PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2012 6:36 pm 
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(I don't know if I have a point. But as long as commenting on the PPK doesn't cost money...)

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 Post subject: Re: Zen Habits' Guide to Eating Plant Based Diet
PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2012 6:57 pm 
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I follow this too, and I really like the way he presented it. It would be a good way to explain this style of eating to the nay-sayers we sometimes.

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 Post subject: Re: Zen Habits' Guide to Eating Plant Based Diet
PostPosted: Fri Sep 28, 2012 9:33 pm 
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Adding this blog to my required reading- lots of good stuff there. Thanks for sharing! I like the FAQ- logical, easygoing, and kind.

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 Post subject: Re: Zen Habits' Guide to Eating Plant Based Diet
PostPosted: Sat Sep 29, 2012 7:04 am 
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Seagull of the PPK
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FootFace wrote:
Quote:
A: There’s nothing wrong with giving them a try now and then when you’re having a craving for something, but in all honesty you don’t need them. They’re more expensive and less healthy. Basically, they’re convenience foods.


And we wouldn't want things to get too, you know, convenient.

i think i can hear that associated eyebrow raise!!!!
he has had numerous posts in the past about changing his eating habits, and i think i might recall some things against (hiss) convenience foods.

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