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 Post subject: Re: Freeganism: Could it be more ethical than veganism?
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 2:49 pm 
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mollyjade wrote:
Do more research! Dumpstered food is usually either food in sealed packaging (like crackers) or that can be peeled (like bananas). And I don't think most people in this thread are talking about food for street people or the homeless. That changes the conversation entirely.

Dumpstered food is dumpstered food. Sealed or not. Where would one research this sort of thing? Last I knew, apples were just as fair game as bananas, even if they aren't up to one's personal standard.

Also, being freegan is more ethical than paying for meat, but being a vegan freegan is even more ethical than that. So just be a vegan freegan. Problem solved! I don't get why freegans always have to be MORE ethical. I think that eating animals is wrong, free or not. So I think that being vegan is more ethical. But if it's not within your means to buy food and you have to be freegan for economical reasons then that is a different story.

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 Post subject: Re: Freeganism: Could it be more ethical than veganism?
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 3:03 pm 
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pandacookie wrote:
Oh my. I don't think many people choose to become homeless with their kids (or without). shiitake happens. Not everyone has a better alternative.


I don't know, all those people that went homeless due to Katrina should've thought about living in a hurricane zone. Also all the people who lost their jobs and homes due to this sucky economy should've done something... not sure what...

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 Post subject: Re: Freeganism: Could it be more ethical than veganism?
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 3:27 pm 
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IsaChandra wrote:
mollyjade wrote:
Do more research! Dumpstered food is usually either food in sealed packaging (like crackers) or that can be peeled (like bananas). And I don't think most people in this thread are talking about food for street people or the homeless. That changes the conversation entirely.

Dumpstered food is dumpstered food. Sealed or not. Where would one research this sort of thing? Last I knew, apples were just as fair game as bananas, even if they aren't up to one's personal standard.

Also, being freegan is more ethical than paying for meat, but being a vegan freegan is even more ethical than that. So just be a vegan freegan. Problem solved! I don't get why freegans always have to be MORE ethical. I think that eating animals is wrong, free or not. So I think that being vegan is more ethical. But if it's not within your means to buy food and you have to be freegan for economical reasons then that is a different story.

I don't think reading a wikipedia article that barely mentions dumpstering is enough to make grand statements on homelessness, which is a very complicated issue. I probably could have worked on my written tone, though.


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 Post subject: Re: Freeganism: Could it be more ethical than veganism?
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 3:54 pm 
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No, of course not. I was responding to dumpstered food usually being sealed. No biggy.

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 Post subject: Re: Freeganism: Could it be more ethical than veganism?
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 4:10 pm 
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BFH wrote:
This is as written by a person who has been privileged for all his life, though found himself temporarily homeless at one point in his life (and I am well aware that my privilege helped me rectify that situation easier than others who find themselves homeless but without the same privilege I have experienced).


A self-confessed person of privilege! Where's H-dog?!

As for food being sealed do people disinfect the packaging before opening or just wash their hands then paw the scabby package? (not talking homeless here)


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 Post subject: Re: Freeganism: Could it be more ethical than veganism?
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 4:57 pm 
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@FootFace: I'm afraid - or happy - it doesn't work that way. Sure, supermarkets pay for their garbage disposal and, in theory, would be happy to reduce these costs (though I don't know whether they pay by volume or not). The reason why food is thrown out at that particular stage has or rather would have, within you scenario, nothing or next to nothing to do with dumpster divers reducing that volume. Food is thrown out because it‘s past its sell-by date (BTW: did you know (I didn't) that the sell-by date is determined by the companies producing the food? The shelf-life of bottled water, for instance, has been reduced to a third over the past few years. Clearly, those companies have an interest in a short shelf-life, whereas the supermarket owner doesn't.), because a new shipment came in, because a bottle etc. broke and soiled the remaining, undamaged, bottles in the lot, because an item doesn't run well, because packaging is missing, because it has an odd shape (if its a fruit or vegetable) and and and. Basically, if it sits there unbought, it costs the supermarket more than if it was thrown out. So, no, I'm afraid that argument can't be made against freeganism, even in your unlikely scenario.

acr wrote:
i know that when you don't make a purchase, that impacts the economy, but it won't ever create a shift in the types of products that economy offers its consumers.

Yes, this is obviously a highly valid point. Still, it raises the question where consuming vegan food/goods trumps decreasing animal suffering (or one's carbon footprint etc.). See, by that same rationale, the more vegan food I buy, the more I'd be shifting the market away from producing animal foods (or, to be precise, foods the production of which had a more or less direct negative impact on the lives of non-human animals). I know that some posters on this forum go by that rationale, that if a product is vegan that's an incentive to go out and buy it, support the company producing it etc., that is, consumption of that product becomes a virtue in itself, regardless of whether it is needed. I have a very strong gut reaction against that. (Even entirely disregarding the animal issue: somebody had to work to produce that, and I'm merely buying it so that s/he has to or can go on (depending on one's POV) producing it, plus perhaps a little amount of pleasure on my part? (Arguing like this I feel I'm managing to be philanthropic and misanthropic at the same time.))

semiautomatic wrote:
my friend mikey is vegan at home, never cooks for himself using animal products, but is vegetarian otherwise, if other people make food that has eggs or something in it. so i guess he's a freegan that way, but he never goes dumpster-diving.

Though I don’t wield any authority in this matter I would be very loath to put the freegan label on this type of behaviour. To me, freeganism isn’t about eating free food but food that would otherwise have gone unused. Well, arguably if Mikey refused to eat the vegetarian fare it would end in the bin as well. But I think most posters here would agree that no statement would have been made. Then again I do appreciate the social implications of such a situation as well.

linanil wrote:
If you are at a party, do you eat what is served? A catering event? If there is no available vegan food and you eat whatever is available, what incentive is there for the caterer/host to prepare vegan food?

Also, where do you draw the line. You mention eggs/milk but what about meat? What about road kill?

No, at parties I eat exclusively vegan or the food I’ve brought myself for exactly that reason. I also wouldn’t eat dumpstered meat / roadkill (though not for any ethical reason but for the pure fact that it is disgusting to me. I therefore also understand why for some if not most of the posters here the mere idea of drinking cow’s milk or eating eggs is gross.)

landofoz wrote:
Not everyone is an ethically conscious veteran.

Amen to that!

landofoz wrote:
But by eating those products, am I making some sort of statement to my omni-friends that veganism isn't possible or isn't desirable? It's so terrible that I'm digging in dumpsters for a dairy fix?

I don’t know whether that’s the message coming across. I doubt it. I think there’s a far greater risk of coming across as nutso.

IsaChandra wrote:
I don't get why freegans always have to be MORE ethical.

I haven’t met any freegans in person nor have I read online discussions between „them“ and „vegans“ so I don’t know whether that generalisation is justified. But I think you’ll understand that as a vegan contemplating freeganism one does ask oneself whether such a switch wouldn’t be mere opportunism and/or hypocrisy. So, in order to justify freeganism to oneself it would have to be more ethical than veganism.

IsaChandra wrote:
So just be a vegan freegan. Problem solved!

If you’re surrounded by vegan stores and Trader Joe’s etc., yes. If not, which is the sad reality over here, then, no, the problem persists.

So, in the end it comes down to the question whether suffering can be compared. Being vegan and buying soy milk means that that cow is left to mind her own business and give her milk to her offspring instead of it being abused for my nutrition. Being freegan and dumpstering cow’s milk means that those tropical snakes and birds and whatnot get to keep their patch of rainforest that would otherwise have been razed to the ground. So, supposedly, it depends on which of the two you ask. Given the enormity of subsidies expended to keep the dairy industry rolling, the cow probably wouldn’t give a flying fudgsicle whether the milk was bought or dumpstered – it would still be gained by the same abusive methods; to the tropical animals, I believe, it would make a difference.


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 Post subject: Re: Freeganism: Could it be more ethical than veganism?
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 5:19 pm 
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Deforestation tends to be caused by soy grown for animal feed, not vegan consumption. I buy my soymilk from a sustainable source, as do many other vegans, just sayin'.


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 Post subject: Re: Freeganism: Could it be more ethical than veganism?
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 5:31 pm 
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fezza wrote:
Deforestation tends to be caused by soy grown for animal feed, not vegan consumption. I buy my soymilk from a sustainable source, as do many other vegans, just sayin'.


Yes that is largely the case in the US. Our two main products, corn and soy, go mostly towards animal feed. The soy also isn't organic, unlike most soymilks. On the other hand, it seems fairly easy to buy soy for human consumption from sustainable sources.

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 Post subject: Re: Freeganism: Could it be more ethical than veganism?
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 5:36 pm 
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linanil wrote:
fezza wrote:
Deforestation tends to be caused by soy grown for animal feed, not vegan consumption. I buy my soymilk from a sustainable source, as do many other vegans, just sayin'.


Yes that is largely the case in the US. Our two main products, corn and soy, go mostly towards animal feed. The soy also isn't organic, unlike most soymilks. On the other hand, it seems fairly easy to buy soy for human consumption from sustainable sources.


and a huge amount of rainforest clearing is done to create land for cattle ranching--much more than for soybean agriculture or growth of other cash crops.

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 Post subject: Re: Freeganism: Could it be more ethical than veganism?
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 5:39 pm 
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acr wrote:
¡gato! wrote:
I emboldened the winners in each of these competitions below.

NatanVee wrote:
What about freeganism vs. communism?
Freeganism vs. post-impressionism?
Freeganism vs. Mothra?
Freganism vs. the Terminator?
Freeganism vs. plaid bondage pants?


but what about freegan mothra vs. the terminator while the terminator is wearing plaid bondage pants?


Hi I have been thinking about this and would like to let you know that I don't know.

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 Post subject: Re: Freeganism: Could it be more ethical than veganism?
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 5:41 pm 
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¡gato! wrote:
acr wrote:

but what about freegan mothra vs. the terminator while the terminator is wearing plaid bondage pants?


Hi I have been thinking about this and would like to let you know that I don't know.


Thread WIN! <3


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 Post subject: Re: Freeganism: Could it be more ethical than veganism?
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 5:42 pm 
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fezza wrote:
¡gato! wrote:
acr wrote:

but what about freegan mothra vs. the terminator while the terminator is wearing plaid bondage pants?


Hi I have been thinking about this and would like to let you know that I don't know.


Thread WIN! <3


seriously. i want to send ¡gato! some kind of trophy.

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 Post subject: Re: Freeganism: Could it be more ethical than veganism?
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 7:52 pm 
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mollyjade wrote:
I don't think most people in this thread are talking about food for street people or the homeless. That changes the conversation entirely.

My problem with dumpster diving as an aspect of freeganism, however, is because of homelessness/poverty.

I am okay, in theory, with people making the personal choice to eat out of dumpsters or from scraping plates. I disagree with the choice and think there are better (and, wrapping, packaging, and banana peels notwithstanding, more sanitary) choices. But I wouldn't force someone out of that choice.

However, if a freegan is privileged enough to be able to buy food from a store, farmer's market, or co-op, or has the wherewithal to turn to a food bank, soup kitchen, church group, or Food Not Bombs, I feel those are more ethical choices than depriving a homeless/street person whose food source are those same dumpsters.
mollyjade wrote:
I don't think reading a wikipedia article that barely mentions dumpstering is enough to make grand statements on homelessness, which is a very complicated issue.

Not intending to making grand statements on homelessness. My point was only meant towards the dumpster diving and plate scraping aspects of freeganism. However, I may not be fully informed about those areas. I tried to at least pick the summary of something that purports to be a freegan manifesto. So...
vegimator wrote:
http://freegan.info/

...this is a lot more helpful. Thanks, vegimator! Very cool site from what I've read so far. Definitely broadens my horizons as to understanding what freeganism is (or at least is capable of being). My view, and I'm sure a lot of people's view, has been limited to dumpster diving and scraping plates, and hasn't included the other aspects of sustainable living as detailed on this informative site.
pandacookie wrote:
I don't think many people choose to become homeless with their kids (or without). shiitake happens. Not everyone has a better alternative.

Yes, some people don't have family or friends, and there are times where homeless shelters can't accommodate people and/or the social safety net breaks in other ways (especially when the Republican Party tears at it). But there are also people for whom homelessness is a result of bad choices, or mental illness, or too much pride (for example, people who refuse to turn to family, friends, or social services for help), and whose children suffer as a result. That these people exist doesn't mean I feel efforts to help people should stop or that anyone should be denied. Food and shelter should be a right, not a privilege.
linanil wrote:
I don't know, all those people that went homeless due to Katrina should've thought about living in a hurricane zone. Also all the people who lost their jobs and homes due to this sucky economy should've done something... not sure what...

That would fall under "extreme circumstances," which I referred to when discussing possibility and probability.

Regardless of the cause of homelessness in any given situation, I still feel there are better alternatives to acquiring food than dumpster diving and scraping plates (i.e. food banks, soup kitchens, church groups, Food Not Bombs - though some FNB chapters acquire their food by dumpster diving, isn't that correct?).


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 Post subject: Re: Freeganism: Could it be more ethical than veganism?
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 8:06 pm 
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Your assumption though is that freegans are taking away food from homeless people. I don't think that is the case although it could be the case in urban areas/areas with a lot of homelessness but then again, why wouldn't those same homeless people turn to the food banks, soup kitchens and other sources you name?

I think the basic assumption is that the food is going to the dump and why not get it before it does?

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 Post subject: Re: Freeganism: Could it be more ethical than veganism?
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 8:28 pm 
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linanil wrote:
Your assumption though is that freegans are taking away food from homeless people. I don't think that is the case although it could be the case in urban areas/areas with a lot of homelessness but then again, why wouldn't those same homeless people turn to the food banks, soup kitchens and other sources you name?

I think the basic assumption is that the food is going to the dump and why not get it before it does?


Yes, my idea that freegans are taking away from homeless is an assumption. At least, my assumption is that they are taking away from the homeless for whom dumpsters are a food source.

Why don't those homeless turn to other sources? Pride, mental illness, bad decision-making (if you believe dumpster diving is not the best choice), or not being aware of those other sources. At least, those are my best guesses. Whatever the reason behind those homeless not seeking choices other than dumpsters, if you are a freegan able to obtain food from sources other than dumpsters, I feel it is more ethical to do so and leave the dumpster food for those homeless.

I could understand dumpster diving simultaneously as a source for one's own food and for gathering for those in need. Making that dive, taking that food, preparing it with a group like Food Not Bombs, and eating it yourself, as well. But I would hope that if it was food from a dumpster being served, that those served were first notified as to its origin. I'm guessing such service is not legal (not that legality is always a concern for everyone's choices), however, and any FNB chapter I've worked with obtained food by donation, not dumpsters (to the best of my knowledge). I would also say that the effort towards dumpster diving would serve all of us better being put towards obtaining donated food, growing food, or raising funds to buy food from co-ops, farmer's markets, etc. (speaking solely first world here... I am aware there is a world outside America, and even parts of it where some of this is difficult if not impossible).

I understand the motivation behind rescuing food before it goes to the dump, if it's in any condition to still be eaten. But I don't think the bad choice of others to throw away food that is still edible necessitates us diving into a dumpster to eat it in order for us to be ethical. Those who desire to eat it are welcome to, but I won't be joining in, whether I'm filthy rich or I end up "between homes" again. Also, I think feeding our children food from the dumpster when we're able to provide food from other sources (whether paid for or donated) is unethical.


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 Post subject: Re: Freeganism: Could it be more ethical than veganism?
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 8:36 pm 
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linanil wrote:
Your assumption though is that freegans are taking away food from homeless people. I don't think that is the case although it could be the case in urban areas/areas with a lot of homelessness but then again, why wouldn't those same homeless people turn to the food banks, soup kitchens and other sources you name?

I think the basic assumption is that the food is going to the dump and why not get it before it does?


I'd go with you are correct. I've spent roughly 2 days a week on skid row downtown for the past 4 years, which has the largest population of homelessness in the US. And from what I've seen, most of these people get their daily nutritional needs met at shelters or food banks. There is so much food downtown it is stunning. It's not healthy, but it's there.

Also, most homeless families are living with friends or family or in a shelter or in special housing. Homeless families going through dumpsters are a rarity. I've only seen one homeless family on the street ever in downtown LA.

Just my two sents. I don't think freegans are messing things up for the homeless AT ALL.


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 Post subject: Re: Freeganism: Could it be more ethical than veganism?
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 8:43 pm 
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I don't think dumpster diving is a solitary effort by those that dumpster dive and can afford food. I wouldn't dumpster dive and conceivably, I have enough family that I would not go homeless but I know that the options I have available to me aren't the options other people have available to them.

I think it disturbs me that so much food is thrown away and I do hope it gets eaten by someone, homeless or not. There are a few grocery stores here that will sell 'ugly' fruit but most don't. Sometimes I can get bananas for 19 cents/lb at the local grocery store but I wonder, what happens to the other fruit/veggies that aren't quite perfect? Well I don't have to wonder, I know that for the most part it goes into the trash. Same with other things that are expired but perfectly fine (which reminds me, a couple weeks ago I made pasta that was 3 years past its sell by date and I just drank some soy milk that was 4 months past its sell by date).

Oh and it was mentioned earlier in this thread that freeganism isn't very scaleable but I also don't expect there to be a freeganism explosion. Certain people will dumpster dive, certain others won't. As long as there is lots of food available, you'll find people who are willing to take advantage.

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 Post subject: Re: Freeganism: Could it be more ethical than veganism?
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 8:47 pm 
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Most of the time, the stores only buy the good looking stuff. Ugly apples and stuff like that are sold on their own to make apple sauce, apple juice, etc. I'm sure a lot does go to the dumpster after they've had it sitting on their shelf for the required amount of time, but mostly the ugly fruits and veggies never get to the see the fluorescent light of the produce aisle.

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 Post subject: Re: Freeganism: Could it be more ethical than veganism?
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 8:54 pm 
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Maybe there should be laws established to govern what to do with unused food, restrictions against discarding edible food? (Of course, libertarians and anarchists may disagree with that.) Would that eliminate the "dangers" of dumpster diving?


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 Post subject: Re: Freeganism: Could it be more ethical than veganism?
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 8:54 pm 
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Well I was talking about the produce that is in stores and doesn't last long. I mean, I've only seen 1 grocery store sell over-ripened bananas around here. Sometimes they might sell a couple other things 'as is' but they are the only store I know that does.

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 Post subject: Re: Freeganism: Could it be more ethical than veganism?
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 9:00 pm 
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Fee wrote:
Most of the time, the stores only buy the good looking stuff. Ugly apples and stuff like that are sold on their own to make apple sauce, apple juice, etc. I'm sure a lot does go to the dumpster after they've had it sitting on their shelf for the required amount of time, but mostly the ugly fruits and veggies never get to the see the fluorescent light of the produce aisle.


Yeah that's true of some foods but what happens to ugly zucchinis?? Answer me that! And don't say premade zucchini bread because there just isn't that much out there.

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 Post subject: Re: Freeganism: Could it be more ethical than veganism?
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 9:02 pm 
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 Post subject: Re: Freeganism: Could it be more ethical than veganism?
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 9:08 pm 
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 Post subject: Re: Freeganism: Could it be more ethical than veganism?
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 10:03 pm 
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From The National Alliance to End Homelessness

Quote:
We define “working poor” as individuals who work at least 27 weeks a year but still fall at or below the poverty line. The “general working population” is defined as all individuals who worked over 27 weeks per year. Based on American Community Survey (ACS) estimates, in 2008 there were an estimated 8,013,629 working poor people; this population represents 19.4 percent of the estimated 41,317,308 living at or below the federal poverty line and 5.5 percent of the 146,152,382 individuals who comprise the general working population.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), “there are three major labor market problems that can hinder a worker’s ability to earn an income above the poverty threshold: low earnings, periods of unemployment, and involuntary part-time employment. In 2008, 85.5 percent of working poor people experienced at least one of the major labor market problems.”

A household is severely housing cost burdened if it pays 50 percent or more of its monthly income on housing costs. Both conditions are either a sign or consequence of housing instability, and can be a precursor to homelessness
Working poor people are much more likely than the general working population to experience both conditions. It is estimated that in 2008, 37.6 percent of working poor households experienced a severe housing cost burden, in comparison to just 3.8 percent of workers in the general population. Likewise, 7.8 percent of the working poor were doubled up with family or friends as compared to less than 6.5 percent of the general working population.

# There are 671,859 people experiencing homelessness on any given night in the United States - roughly 22 of every 10,000 people are homeless.
# Of that number, 37 percent are people in families and 63 percent are individuals,
# 18 percent of the homeless population is considered "chronic," and
# 20 percent of the homeless population is made up of veterans.

Typically, families become homeless as a result of some unforeseen financial crisis - a medical emergency, a car accident, a death in the family - that prevents them from being able to hold on to housing. An estimated 85,000 families experience homelessness each night.

Most homeless families are able to bounce back from homelessness quickly, with relatively little public assistance. Usually, homeless families require rent assistance, housing placement services, job assistance, and other short-term, one-time services before being able to return to independence and stability.


Please never use "bad decisions" when referring how families become homeless. If you have never been one paycheck away from the streets, you are lucky and should spend some of your free time with Food Not Bombs.

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You people are way less funny than Pandacookie. Sucks to be you.-interrobang?!


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 Post subject: Re: Freeganism: Could it be more ethical than veganism?
PostPosted: Tue Dec 07, 2010 11:10 pm 
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Not NOT A Furry

Joined: Tue Nov 30, 2010 7:41 pm
Posts: 460
Quote:
We define “working poor”...
<snip>
A household is severely housing cost burdened..
<snip>
(etc.)

Important info, but for a different discussion. (This discussion itself is already a tangent from the thread topic as it is.)
Quote:
Typically, families become homeless as a result of some unforeseen financial crisis - a medical emergency, a car accident, a death in the family - that prevents them from being able to hold on to housing. An estimated 85,000 families experience homelessness each night.

Yes, these are possible reasons families may become homeless. Bad decisions are another possibility.

Perhaps there are more circumstances where one's children becoming homeless is inevitable than there are circumstances where one could have made different decisions to avoid it, but my feeling (not informed opinion or indisputable fact, just my feeling based on conjecture) is that the opposite is true, that more often there are strategies which one could take to avoid one's children from becoming homeless than situations where it could not have been helped in any way (regardless of whether or not the parent's homelessness was, in of itself, inevitable).

Perhaps there are reasons to let one's children remain homeless, but my feeling is that if it were me, I would secure safe, short term shelter for my children first and endure being homeless by myself, doing what was necessary to secure safe, long term shelter for my children, and then hopefully, myself as well. I think this is a more ethical choice then, say, using my child to invoke sympathy from people whom I then beg for money. I think there are better ways to expend effort to benefit one's children than that. Thankfully, for the very brief time I was without a residence (and I had a support network to rely on until I secured new residency), I only had myself to worry about, and not any children.
Quote:
Most homeless families are able to bounce back from homelessness quickly, with relatively little public assistance. Usually, homeless families require rent assistance, housing placement services, job assistance, and other short-term, one-time services before being able to return to independence and stability.

That this is the case is good news, better than it not being temporary. I support more federal funding for all of the above (and new federal funding for where there is none) to make sure more return to being independent and stable (but are taken care of while they are not). But some families don't bounce back and instead remain homeless, and some of these instances are a result of bad decisions (whether those decisions are the decisions that caused their homelessness, continued it, or both).
Vantine wrote:
Please never use "bad decisions" when referring how families become homeless.

The reasons people I've known ended up without a home include:

    mistreating their partner and getting kicked out
    mismanaging their money and getting kicked out
    gambling their money away and getting kicked out
    choosing drinks or drugs instead of paying rent and getting kicked out
    running away with somebody they thought was cute
    one or more of their parents doing one or more of the above

If you disagree with my opinion that those are a result of somebody making bad decisions, then maybe we define "bad decision" differently. Otherwise, it wouldn't be accurate to never identify "bad decisions" as one of the possible causes that individuals or families end up homeless.
Vantine wrote:
If you have never been one paycheck away from the streets, you are lucky and should spend some of your free time with Food Not Bombs.

I have been one paycheck away and zero paychecks away from being without a home, bad decisions being a part of the reason why (long story, certainly not one I intend to tell here). I do consider myself lucky, though in this case, for being able to get out of it. I look forward to again spending some of my free time with Food Not Bombs soon (it's been a long time...), and help folks who weren't as privileged as me to get out of that situation (whether or not they arrived or remain at it because of bad decisions), or at least, help them with food while they're in it.


Last edited by BFH on Tue Dec 07, 2010 11:25 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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