| Register  | FAQ  | Search | Login 
It is currently Tue Sep 16, 2014 4:29 am

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 9 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Shojin ryori/temple cuisine
PostPosted: Sat Jan 05, 2013 8:47 pm 
Offline
Has it on Blue Vinyl
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 19, 2010 8:40 pm
Posts: 2145
I spent a couple of weeks in Taiwan last summer and had access to gorgeous shojin ryori meals. I'm really interested in learning more about how to cook in this style. I have 1. Elizabeth Andoh's Kansha and 2. Miyoko Schinner's Japanese Cooking: Traditional and Contemporary. I am looking for recipes and resources for other traditional shojin ryori food. Can anyone help?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Shojin ryori/temple cuisine
PostPosted: Sat Jan 05, 2013 9:11 pm 
Offline
So Totally Yiffy

Joined: Fri Feb 17, 2012 6:36 pm
Posts: 39
I have The Enlightened Kitchen Fresh Vegetable Dishes From The Temples of Japan by Mari Fujii but haven't made any of the recipes yet.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Shojin ryori/temple cuisine
PostPosted: Sat Jan 05, 2013 9:15 pm 
Offline
Has it on Blue Vinyl
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 19, 2010 8:40 pm
Posts: 2145
Yes, I have seen that but it looks like fusion cuisine - I don't want fusion!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Shojin ryori/temple cuisine
PostPosted: Sun Jan 06, 2013 12:24 pm 
Offline
Saggy Butt
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2010 3:08 pm
Posts: 285
Location: Vienna
Eggplant dengaku from Appetite for Reduction tastes exactly like the one i had at a temple in Japan. SOooo good!
And I'm a big fan of Miyoko's Japanese book.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Shojin ryori/temple cuisine
PostPosted: Sun Jan 06, 2013 1:49 pm 
Offline
Seagull of the PPK
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 19, 2010 6:46 pm
Posts: 7973
Location: Brasil
Kansha is famous- I haven't gotten to look at it yet but she has some interesting sites (one is a member thing and i didn't see too much).
I'm not super big on shojin, but this is what I have in the files if you'd like: (pardon me if it's from your site. I couldn't tell you where they came from; i have tried them all at some point and thank whomever composed the recipes)

SHINGJAGAIMO NO GOMA FUMIAE (New Potatoes in Sesame Sauce) (Serves 4)

1 1/2 Tablespoons soy sauce
1 Tablespoon Japanese rice vinegar
1/2 teaspoon rice syrup
1/2 teaspoon karashi Japanese mustard
1 teaspoon Oriental sesame oil
2 medium-size new potatoes
2 small cucumbers

Start a 3/4 full, 3-quart pot of boiling water on the stove. Mix the soy sauce, rice vinegar, rice syrup, mustard, and sesame oil together in a small bowl. Let this mixture stand.
Peel and cut the potatoes into 1/4 inch julienne strips, 2 1/2 to 3 inches long. Rinse the julienne pieces, then drop them into the boiling water. Make sure all the potatoes are in the boiling water. When the water reboils, count to 10 slowly, then empty the potatoes into a bowl with cold tap water running into it. Wait until the potatoes are cool, then drain and let them sit in a colander.
Peel and seed the cucumbers. Cut the trimmed cucumbers into julienne strips the same size as the potatoes. In a bowl, mix the potato and cucumber strips together, then gently pour the sesame sauce all over the vegetables. Let the dish marinate a few minutes. Serve at room temperature or cold.

KABU NO ICHIYAZUKE (Quick Turnip Pickles) (Serves 4)

Turnip pickles are served with just about every meal in Japanese vegetarian restaurants and monasteries.

5-6 fresh turnips, no more than 2 1/2 inches in diameter
3 teaspoons sea salt

Remove the leaves and stems from the turnips. Wash leaves, stems, and turnips carefully, then cut the turnips into 1/4 inch rounds. Place on a flat plate, then sprinkle with 2 teaspoons of salt. In a pot, boil the turnip leaves and stems for 1-2 minutes. Cool under running water. Cut into 1/4 inch long pieces. Sprinkle on the remaining salt. Spread the cut, salted leaves over the salted turnips in a screwtop pickling jar, or place turnips and leaves under a heavy weight. Leave the vegetable to cure overnight.
It's a good idea to rinse the turnip pickles slightly before serving, then toss and drain in a colander. Serve cool. Add soy sauce to taste.

SHIITAKE-KOMBU DASHI (Mushroom and Seaweed Seasoning Broth) (Serves 4)

A fresh vegetarian dashi that can be prepared in 3-4 hours from shiitake (mushrooms) and kombu (seaweed) blended together with seasonings such as sea salt. This broth is a base to which many other flavorings will be added. I have yet to see it for sale in any stores in the United States.

4 x 4 inches of kombu seaweed (available in Oriental groceries and health food stores)
4-5 high-quality, dried shiitake mushrooms
4 cups water

Wipe the kombu clean with a damp paper towel. Let the kombu soak in the water for at least 3 hours, then heat the water until it is just about boiling. Turn the flame off, remove the kombu, add the shiitake mushrooms, and let stand for 20 minutes. Remove the shiitakes (use them in a stir-fry dish fairly soon). You now have shiitake-kombu dashi. Store the liquid in the refrigerator in a closed container.

NINJIN NO AMANI (Sweet Cooked Carrots) (Serves 4)

This carrot recipe makes use of the shiitake mushrooms from the shiitake-kombu dashi.

1/2 pound peeled carrots
4-5 shiitake mushrooms, soaked in hot water 30 minutes, then sliced 1/4 inch thick, or from the shiitake-kombu prepared in the above recipe
1 cup shiitake-kombu dashi
1/4 teaspoon sea salt
1 teaspoon rice syrup or other sweetener
1-2 teaspoons mirin (sweet vinegar available in Oriental groceries)

Peel the carrots and cut in rounds about 1/4 inch thick. Combine all ingredients except carrots and mushrooms in a saucepan and cook together five minutes on low heat. Add the carrots and sliced mushrooms, and simmer 5-10 minutes or until all the liquid is absorbed in the soft vegetables. Serve at room temperature.

MUSHINASU (Steamed Eggplant) (Serves 4)

Any leftovers can be left in the sauce for one day.

4 or 5 3/4 pound Oriental eggplants (the long, purplish ones) or 2 one-pound European-type eggplants
1 Tablespoon soy sauce
1 teaspoon sesame oil
1 Tablespoon chopped onions
1 Tablespoon rice vinegar
1/2 to 1 Tablespoon rice syrup

Cut away the tops and bottoms of the eggplants. Steam them gently 5-7 minutes, or until soft. Test with a toothpick or bamboo skewer. When eggplants are done, let them cool. When they're cool, cut them into quarters, lengthwise. Refrigerate until ready to serve, then spread the cool eggplants around a flat plate to form an 8-pointed star. Combine the sauce ingredients and pour all over the eggplants. Serve with hot rice at room temperature.

OKURA NO NIBITASHI (Okra Stew) (Serves 4)

Another recipe using shiitake-kombu dashi.

20 okra pods
2 teaspoons salt
1 cup shiitake-kombu dashi (see previous recipe)
1 teaspoon usukuchi (light) soy sauce
1/2 Tablespoon mirin (sweet vinegar)
Sesame seeds (for garnish)

Wash the okra, then cut the stems off. Rub each pod with salt, taking off the okra fuzz on the skin with your fingers. Wash your hands after this operation. Drop the trimmed and cleaned okra into a large pot of boiling water until they soften slightly, about 3-5 minutes.
Combine the dashi, usukuchi, and mirin in a 3-quart pot. Bring to a boil, add the okra and let them boil for 1-2 minutes. Remove from the heat. Let the pot stand until it is cool. Arrange on a serving dish, then sprinkle dry roasted sesame seeds over the stewed okra.

Sesame Tofu Yield: 6 servings
Ingredients: 400 g white sesame seeds (untoasted)
8 cups water
less than 2 cups Yoshino kuzu starch
1tsp salt
1 cup sake
soy sauce and grated wasabi to taste
seasonal garnishes for decoration
Instructions:

1. Soak sesame seeds in plenty of water overnight. Strain and rinse. Strain again.
2. Place the sesame seeds into the suribachi. Add 4 cups of water and grind thoroughly. Move the surikogi in a circular motion until the mixture takes on a smooth consistency (you will notice the sound of grinding getting lower).
3. Add 4 more cups of water and blend. Pour mixture through a bleached cotton cloth into a large pot. Make sure to squeeze out all the liquid.
4. Place a small strainer in the pot. Put kuzu, salt and sake in the strainer. Blend the mixture by hand until all lumps disappear.
5. Remove the strainer and place the pot over high heat. Stir continuously with a wooden spatula, making sure not to let it burn. After approximately 10 minutes, the mixture will thicken. Keep stirring vigorously for 10 more minutes, until the mixture becomes completely smooth.
6. Pour the mixture into a slightly wet mould (16.5 centimeters by 21 centimeters by 4.5 centimeters) and let cool. Cover the surface with plastic wrap and place the container in cold water. After about one hour in winter (two in summer), transfer the sesame tofu to a wooden cutting board. Cut into 16 pieces and place in a bowl of water. Serve on a plate with soy sauce, topped with grated wasabi. Decorate with something seasonal, such as an autumn leaf.

_________________
Buddha says 'Meh'.--matwinser
I'm just a drunk who likes fruit. -- Desdemona


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Shojin ryori/temple cuisine
PostPosted: Sun Jan 06, 2013 2:00 pm 
Offline
Has it on Blue Vinyl
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 19, 2010 8:40 pm
Posts: 2145
Torque, THANK YOU so much! I am excited to try these!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Shojin ryori/temple cuisine
PostPosted: Sun Jan 06, 2013 3:29 pm 
Offline
Not NOT A Furry
User avatar

Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2012 7:11 pm
Posts: 474
Shojin Cooking by Keizo Kobayashi is an oldie but a goodie. There are a couple of excellent books by Toshio Tanahashi, but as far as I know they're only in Japanese.

Buddha Gate Monastery has several zhāicài recipes in English.

Taiwanese or Mainland Chinese zhāicài would differ somewhat from Japanese shojin ryori -- and even from each other by region in China. The same is true of Korean sachal eumsik. It's much more difficult to find recipes in English than in Japanese, Chinese, or Korean.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Shojin ryori/temple cuisine
PostPosted: Sun Jan 06, 2013 5:44 pm 
Offline
Banned from Vegan Freaks.
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2010 8:44 pm
Posts: 352
Location: Northern Ontario
Thank you for all contributions to this thread ! I'm also interested in learning more about Shojin Ryori and Japanese cooking in general.

I found the book - Zen Vegetarian Cooking by Soei Yoneda - to be a good resource on both the art and recipes of Shojin Ryori cooking. Simple recipes. Good drawings and lots of pictures.

More detailed book review here:

http://living-vegan.blogspot.ca/2007/02 ... oking.html


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Shojin ryori/temple cuisine
PostPosted: Sun Jan 06, 2013 5:54 pm 
Offline
Not NOT A Furry
User avatar

Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2012 7:11 pm
Posts: 474
Padraigin wrote:
Thank you for all contributions to this thread ! I'm also interested in learning more about Shojin Ryori and Japanese cooking in general.

I found the book - Zen Vegetarian Cooking by Soei Yoneda - to be a good resource on both the art and recipes of Shojin Ryori cooking. Simple recipes. Good drawings and lots of pictures.

More detailed book review here:

http://living-vegan.blogspot.ca/2007/02 ... oking.html


Oooh, that does look good. I'd like to have a look at Soei Yoneda's Good Food from a Japanese Temple as well.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 9 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot], zwingtip and 7 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group
Template made by DEVPPL/ThatBigForum and fancied up by What Cheer