| Register  | FAQ  | Search | Login 
It is currently Sun Sep 21, 2014 5:50 am

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5399 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159, 160 ... 216  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Fri May 31, 2013 3:00 pm 
Offline
Invented Vegan Meringue
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2010 5:20 pm
Posts: 3931
Location: Edinburgh
I finished Dead Ever After. As suspected, it was really predictable. I would say it was only marginally better than book 10 (I think that was the terrible one - they all kinda meld together after a while). It was a quick, fluffy read, which is what I wanted, but I agree with the person who said they were basically relieved when they finished. I hope Charlaine Harris goes back to the Aurora Teagarden series.

I'm now reading The Great Gatsby. I read it in high school, but that was a long damn time ago, and I barely remember anything about it, so I'm counting it as a new read.

_________________
A pie eating contest is a battle with no losers. - amandabear


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Fri May 31, 2013 3:03 pm 
Offline
Should Spend More Time Helping the Animals
User avatar

Joined: Tue Dec 07, 2010 4:57 pm
Posts: 6496
Location: Boston, MA
I was just talking about The Great Gatsby, rachell37! I might read it next. I can't remember if I actually read it in high school or if I just faked it. Some days I feel like I'll never finish Wolf Hall. I'm enjoying it, but I really need to get through it at this point.

_________________
I would eat Dr. Cow pocket cheese in a second. I would eat it if you hid it under your hat, or in your backpack, but not if it was in your shoe. That's where I draw the line. -allularpunk


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Fri May 31, 2013 9:37 pm 
Offline
Discovered unobtainium
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 19, 2010 9:21 pm
Posts: 12115
Location: Dinosaur Stampede
I'm almost finished The Bone Collector (Deaver). Gave up on Rimrock after a few chapters, but I'll probably come back to it next time I'm in an odd enough mood.

Then I think it's time to reread Sister Carrie. It's been 5-6 years. I wonder if I'll love it as much as I always do.

My reading is kind of frenetic lately. I feel like I need a relaxing book that I won't tear through as quickly. I've read a lot of good (fluff mostly) books in the past two weeks, but my brain is starting to spin.

_________________
"This is the creepiest post ever if you don't know who Molly is." -Fee
"a vegan death match sounds like something where we all end up hugging." -LisaPunk


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Sun Jun 02, 2013 3:50 pm 
Offline
Invented Vegan Meringue
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2010 5:20 pm
Posts: 3931
Location: Edinburgh
Finished The Great Gatsby. I found it much more interesting and understandable than the last time I read it.

Spoiled because there are probably some people who haven't read it.
Spoiler: show
For some reason, I thought it ended when he died, but it went on for another few chapters.


Now I'm reading Pride and Prejudice. I like it so far, but I can only see Mr Darcy as Colin Firth. Not that that's a bad thing.

_________________
A pie eating contest is a battle with no losers. - amandabear


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Sun Jun 02, 2013 7:04 pm 
Offline
Making Threats to Punks Again
User avatar

Joined: Tue Feb 26, 2013 9:14 am
Posts: 1096
Location: Edinburgh, Scotland
I'm just starting The Night Watch by Sarah Waters.

_________________
My blog about travel, campaigning, activism, vegan food and stuff.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Sun Jun 02, 2013 8:18 pm 
Offline
Drinks Wild Tofurkey
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2010 2:23 pm
Posts: 2932
If anyone would like all of Kurt Vonnegut's books, let me know and I'll send them to you. They have been much loved, but I know I will not reread them. PM me!

_________________
Mal: We're still flying.
Simon: That's not much.
Mal: It's enough.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Tue Jun 04, 2013 7:22 pm 
Offline
Dr Bronners, MD
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2010 7:08 pm
Posts: 4951
Location: WV
I just got Player One by Douglas Coupland and Always Coming Home by Ursula K. Le Guin from the library and am pretty pumped about both! Flowers for Algernon has indeed made me almost cry a few times...only a few pages left in that one. Excellent read, though.

_________________
But if one were to tickle Pluto, I suspect that it might very quietly laugh. - pandacookie

55k usd is like 4 cad or whatever equivalent in beavers you use on the island - joshua


Awesome. Vegan. Rad.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Tue Jun 04, 2013 7:25 pm 
Offline
Dr Bronners, MD
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2010 7:08 pm
Posts: 4951
Location: WV
Also just remembered that I meant to start reading the Discworld series. Tried starting the Foundation series by Asimov, but the library didn't have any, and the three I have are out of order.

_________________
But if one were to tickle Pluto, I suspect that it might very quietly laugh. - pandacookie

55k usd is like 4 cad or whatever equivalent in beavers you use on the island - joshua


Awesome. Vegan. Rad.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Wed Jun 05, 2013 12:44 pm 
Offline
Flounceiad 2011
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 19, 2010 8:26 pm
Posts: 5515
Location: A New England
rachell37 wrote:
Finished The Great Gatsby. I found it much more interesting and understandable than the last time I read it.
I just finished reading it for the first time; it was one of those that somehow slipped through the cracks (I never had it assigned in HS or undergrad, did all English/British literature for grad school coursework, and wasn't bowled over by other Fitzgerald I'd read). Anyway, "stuff I haven't but should have read" is sort of the theme of my summer fun reading, so I finally picked it up.

Given its iconic status in the American literary canon, I have to admit to being pretty underwhelmed; while the prose is occasionally quite beautiful, my ultimate feeling about the novel was, "So what?" If the narrator's point is the hollowness/artificiality/impossibility of meaningful human connection or "authentic" identity, why should we be any more interested in Carraway's reminiscences about fundamentally empty characters than in the characters themselves? And in terms of playing with form, temporality, narration, etc., contemporary British modernists like Ford, Woolf, and (most experimentally) Joyce were doing similar things, but in much more interesting ways. Now I'm onto Katherine Mansfield's short stories, which are roughly contemporary and pretty delicious, and after that is Never Let Me Go, which I've never read despite being a huge Ishiguro fan.

_________________
Nothing is safe from weiners in my neighborhood... ~ crowderpea
I didn't embarrass him by saying anything about wanking ~ 8ball
"SMLOUNCE!" ~ smurfterrobang?!
http://elizaveganpage.blogspot.com


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Wed Jun 05, 2013 3:30 pm 
Offline
Grandfathered In
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 19, 2010 1:41 pm
Posts: 9583
Location: Seattle
I finally finished Lost Everything, by Brian Francis Slattery. I thought it was beautiful and strange and sad (like his other books), but my attention span is so ridiculous it took me something like 5 weeks to get through it.

_________________
Did somebody say Keep on rockin?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Wed Jun 05, 2013 3:50 pm 
Offline
Dr Bronners, MD
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2010 7:08 pm
Posts: 4951
Location: WV
Desdemona wrote:
...Never Let Me Go, which I've never read despite being a huge Ishiguro fan.


LOVE that book!

_________________
But if one were to tickle Pluto, I suspect that it might very quietly laugh. - pandacookie

55k usd is like 4 cad or whatever equivalent in beavers you use on the island - joshua


Awesome. Vegan. Rad.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Wed Jun 05, 2013 5:35 pm 
Offline
WELFARIST!
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2010 1:57 pm
Posts: 5127
I love all these new Great Gatsby readers! Is the resurgence/your interests in the novel anything to do with the movie? I re-read half of it after coming home from the movie a couple of weeks ago but I still haven't finished it but I've read it a bajillion times awready so no matter. I have a book "College of One" I picked up at the bookstore last week, written by Sheila Graham (FSF's love/companion at the time of his death) and it's about how he educated her, creating a syllabus from books that influenced him, etc. I'm just sort of picking through it, a couple of chapters in. It's not the most fascinating book but a must for FSF minutae lovers, like me

Desdemona wrote:
Given its iconic status in the American literary canon, I have to admit to being pretty underwhelmed; while the prose is occasionally quite beautiful, my ultimate feeling about the novel was, "So what?" If the narrator's point is the hollowness/artificiality/impossibility of meaningful human connection or "authentic" identity, why should we be any more interested in Carraway's reminiscences about fundamentally empty characters than in the characters themselves? And in terms of playing with form, temporality, narration, etc., contemporary British modernists like Ford, Woolf, and (most experimentally) Joyce were doing similar things, but in much more interesting ways.

Yes, Daisy is a particularly hollow character. And Jordan. And all the party-goers. In fact, everyone pretty much except for Mr. Wilson, NC (I suppose by virtue of his insight into the true nature of Gatsby because we only know about Nick relative to Gatsby) and Gatsby are the "careless people" (also, that other guy, the only one who shows up at the funeral and, Dorothy Parker anecdote here. You remember how one of the people who attended Gatsby's funeral stood over his body and said "The poor son of a bisque." That's what Dorothy Parker said, standing over Fitzgerald's body at his wake: "The poor son of a bisque.")

For me, what sets FSF apart is his romanticism. I've been reading Nabakov lately (or is it Nabokov?) and falling in love with him and thinking long and hard why I love FSF so when I can find writing stylists equally admirable in their own fashion and it's that romanticism, for me, that cements FSF in my heart. That unmistakeable Keatsian influence that runs through both Tender is the Night and The Great Gatsby.

When you think about the premise of the Great Gatsby though, it's pretty damn juvenile: Diehard dreamer so in love with this girl he corrupts himself (only superficially--never corrupts himself spiritually) to get rich quick and buy a grand mansion conveniently across the way from her and throws lavish parties so she'll notice him and one day find him again. Ridiculous, right? And right next door, conveniently, is this woman's cousin and an entree into his beloved woman's world. Most importantly, all the corruption that surrounds him that he propogates, in a way, can't touch Gatsby's untouchable romantic heart and he dies innocent never knowing that his heart's about to be broken, anyway, by Daisy and she's going to stay with Tom (indicated by the fried chicken scene at the end of the book) and he's still watching over her right up until the end and holding her up as his golden girl and he dies never knowing he really can't repeat the past after all. Most writers wouldn't dare attempt such romantic frivolty. Re-reading that, that's in the back of my mind...this is RIDICULOUS, so immature--who does this? But I love it. I love it.

Here's Christopher Hitchens on Gatsby: http://www.vanityfair.com/culture/featu ... hens200005

_________________
"I'm sorry! I'm Canadian!"


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Thu Jun 06, 2013 8:09 am 
Offline
Trapped On A Desert Island With A Cow
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2010 1:30 pm
Posts: 435
Location: New Jersey
From what I remember of Gatsby there is no doubt that the superficiality of the characters is evident and intentional. I remember loving Fitzgerald in my youth largely because of the "pretty people and places" and not being offended by how empty most of the vessels were. I don't know that I would appreciate that as much now. I just finished rereading Brideshead Revisited and had much the same reaction to many of the characters (Julia Flyte, Celia Ryder etc) as Desdemona had to the Gatsby characters. I also loved this book and the miniseries etc when I was much younger. So perhaps I am just less romantic these days Sniff sniff.

I now moved on to Mystic River. Not much pretty or romantic here so probably will be a good contrast.

_________________
formerly known as gwgredux...if you are keeping track.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Thu Jun 06, 2013 8:10 am 
Offline
Trapped On A Desert Island With A Cow
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2010 1:30 pm
Posts: 435
Location: New Jersey
From what I remember of Gatsby there is no doubt that the superficiality of the characters is evident and intentional. I remember loving Fitzgerald in my youth largely because of the "pretty people and places" and not being offended by how empty most of the vessels were. I don't know that I would appreciate that as much now. I just finished rereading Brideshead Revisited and had much the same reaction to many of the characters (Julia Flyte, Celia Ryder etc) as Desdemona had to the Gatsby characters. I also loved this book and the miniseries etc when I was much younger. So perhaps I am just less romantic these days Sniff sniff.

I now moved on to Mystic River. Not much pretty or romantic here so probably will be a good contrast.

_________________
formerly known as gwgredux...if you are keeping track.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Thu Jun 06, 2013 9:27 am 
Offline
WELFARIST!
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2010 1:57 pm
Posts: 5127
Yeah, I think what makes Fitzgerald interesting (for me) is that he never really grew up in the sense that he's still writing these fairy tale type love stories as a fully mature writer. He was a man who really believed in the transformative power of romantic love if the nature of his some of his stories is any indication. I mean, when I read the synopsis of Gatsby, it's fairytalesque. Most mature writers aren't going to conceptualize something like that, that's really a sort of naive point of view in the final analysis, in a shallow setting of twenties excess and the unsympathetic idle rich, and bring it to fruition. And he had a rough life, despite the jazz age freewheeling reputation, a hard and long fall in the 1930s that saw a lot of humiliations for him as a writer and his work largely forgotten. What I love about Fitz as a person is that I think he shares with Gatsby what he attributes to JG's character in the book. The "romantic readiness" and endless capacity for hope and whatnot. I think FSF had that as a human being and it came through his writing. I've read The Last Tycoon (his last, unfinished book) and that fanciful type romance is still there with Monroe Stahr,the protagonist in that book and you know, Fitz is a forty-something year old man by then, seasoned and having taken a lot of knocks, and he's still got that hope, he's still got that dream in his writing that love really can conquer all. I remember he wrote to Zelda once a frustrated letter in the last few years of his life: "Please leave me in peace with my hemorrhages and my hopes." I've always thought that says a lot about him right there.

_________________
"I'm sorry! I'm Canadian!"


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Thu Jun 06, 2013 9:38 am 
Offline
Should Write a Goddam Book Already
User avatar

Joined: Fri Oct 22, 2010 9:09 am
Posts: 1082
Location: Denver
I really enjoyed Always Coming Home, AP. Particularly, I like that she imagines family life in a largely non-hierarchical society totally differently than in The Dispossessed.

I just finished Wild Seed by Octavia Buttler. I realized that I have two of the Patternist series left to read, and then there is no more Octavia Buttler EVER. Book. The worst part is our library does not have these books.

While I wait for the library to deliver comic books and Neal Stephenson to my branch for me, I am trying to read some Jean Genet. It seems like there is a lot of word play, so I would be better off reading it in the original French, but I don't read French. Oh well.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Thu Jun 06, 2013 10:04 am 
Offline
Invented Vegan Meringue
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2010 5:20 pm
Posts: 3931
Location: Edinburgh
seitanicverses wrote:
I love all these new Great Gatsby readers! Is the resurgence/your interests in the novel anything to do with the movie? I re-read half of it after coming home from the movie a couple of weeks ago but I still haven't finished it but I've read it a bajillion times awready so no matter. I have a book "College of One" I picked up at the bookstore last week, written by Sheila Graham (FSF's love/companion at the time of his death) and it's about how he educated her, creating a syllabus from books that influenced him, etc. I'm just sort of picking through it, a couple of chapters in. It's not the most fascinating book but a must for FSF minutae lovers, like me

I think part of my desire to (re)read it is to do with your love of FSF! It may have been partially talk of the film (which I haven't seen) - I honestly can't remember. It's just one of those books that so many people have read and know.

_________________
A pie eating contest is a battle with no losers. - amandabear


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Thu Jun 06, 2013 12:30 pm 
Offline
Invented Vegan Meringue
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2010 1:31 pm
Posts: 3928
Location: Graz, Austria
Sitting at home with the flu (or at least a very stupid throat infection with some additional stupid cold symptoms) re-re-re-reading HOWL by Allen Ginsberg. A million times.

I mean...

the starry dynamo in the machinery of night

&

a yellow paper rose twisted
on a wire hanger in the closet, and even that
imaginary, nothing but a hopeful little bit of
hallucination

!!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Thu Jun 06, 2013 12:36 pm 
Offline
Discovered unobtainium
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 19, 2010 9:21 pm
Posts: 12115
Location: Dinosaur Stampede
Coffin Dancer by y Jeffrey Deaver.

I've gone from blowing through 2-3 books a day to my brain not working again, so this is kind of slow going.

_________________
"This is the creepiest post ever if you don't know who Molly is." -Fee
"a vegan death match sounds like something where we all end up hugging." -LisaPunk


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Thu Jun 06, 2013 4:33 pm 
Offline
Invented Vegan Meringue
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2010 5:20 pm
Posts: 3931
Location: Edinburgh
I finished Pride and Prejudice, and I loved it. I've already put more Jane Austen on my list.

I got some books from the library, so I'm finally gonna read Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil. It's been on my list for years, and I don't know why I've never read it.

_________________
A pie eating contest is a battle with no losers. - amandabear


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Fri Jun 07, 2013 12:05 pm 
Offline
Nailed to the V

Joined: Fri May 31, 2013 3:51 am
Posts: 595
Location: Cambridge England
I am reading 'A Country Boy' - Richard Hillyer and reading for about the 3rd time 'Novel on Yellow Paper' - Stevie Smith

Anne

_________________
"happiness is difficult to find within, impossible to find elsewhere"
"A towel, it says, is about the most massively useful thing an interstellar hitchhiker can have"


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Fri Jun 07, 2013 2:21 pm 
Offline
WELFARIST!
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2010 1:57 pm
Posts: 5127
rachell37 wrote:
seitanicverses wrote:
I love all these new Great Gatsby readers! Is the resurgence/your interests in the novel anything to do with the movie? I re-read half of it after coming home from the movie a couple of weeks ago but I still haven't finished it but I've read it a bajillion times awready so no matter. I have a book "College of One" I picked up at the bookstore last week, written by Sheila Graham (FSF's love/companion at the time of his death) and it's about how he educated her, creating a syllabus from books that influenced him, etc. I'm just sort of picking through it, a couple of chapters in. It's not the most fascinating book but a must for FSF minutae lovers, like me

I think part of my desire to (re)read it is to do with your love of FSF! It may have been partially talk of the film (which I haven't seen) - I honestly can't remember. It's just one of those books that so many people have read and know.

Ha! Well, I'm glad it's contagious, but I do apologize if I've influenced anyone at any time to read a book they don't like!

Here's a clip of FSF reading the first three stanzas of Ode to A Nightingale:

And a speech from Othello:

_________________
"I'm sorry! I'm Canadian!"


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Fri Jun 07, 2013 2:41 pm 
Offline
Flounceiad 2011
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 19, 2010 8:26 pm
Posts: 5515
Location: A New England
seitanicverses wrote:

Here's a clip of FSF reading the first three stanzas of Ode to A Nightingale:
Interesting. Upthread you mentioned that Fitzgerald had a great fondness for Keats, whose work I have never liked. (NB that having to do an on-the-spot close reading of "Ode to A Nightingale" during my oral comprehensive exam did nothing to endear him to me, and that I'm not a fan of the romantics in general; Wordsworth can be okay, but my loathing for Shelley is virulent. "Mont Blanc" made me want to A. kill myself, B. dig the poet up and kill him, or C. both.) Anyway, while I don't know enough about Keats or Fitzgerald to draw any critically informed parallels, I can't help wondering if my lack of enthusiasm for both writers is rooted in something stylistically and/or thematically related. Maybe there's some connective tissue between the two that I'm responding to without really understanding what it is?

_________________
Nothing is safe from weiners in my neighborhood... ~ crowderpea
I didn't embarrass him by saying anything about wanking ~ 8ball
"SMLOUNCE!" ~ smurfterrobang?!
http://elizaveganpage.blogspot.com


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Fri Jun 07, 2013 2:44 pm 
Offline
WELFARIST!
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2010 1:57 pm
Posts: 5127
I just checked the liberry website and The Richard Burton Diaries are ready for me to pickup. Woot! I've been waiting for this one. I have to read it in three weeks though because you're not allowed to renew books that have running wait lists (this is a new release and so there are still folks on the waiting list behind me). Three weeks, for me, isn't a lot of time (don't have much time for leisure reading) and I think it's a longish book.

_________________
"I'm sorry! I'm Canadian!"


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: And what are we reading now?
PostPosted: Fri Jun 07, 2013 2:52 pm 
Offline
WELFARIST!
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2010 1:57 pm
Posts: 5127
Desdemona wrote:
seitanicverses wrote:

Here's a clip of FSF reading the first three stanzas of Ode to A Nightingale:
Interesting. Upthread you mentioned that Fitzgerald had a great fondness for Keats, whose work I have never liked. (NB that having to do an on-the-spot close reading of "Ode to A Nightingale" during my oral comprehensive exam did nothing to endear him to me, and that I'm not a fan of the romantics in general; Wordsworth can be okay, but my loathing for Shelley is virulent. "Mont Blanc" made me want to A. kill myself, B. dig the poet up and kill him, or C. both.) Anyway, while I don't know enough about Keats or Fitzgerald to draw any critically informed parallels, I can't help wondering if my lack of enthusiasm for both writers is rooted in something stylistically and/or thematically related. Maybe there's some connective tissue between the two that I'm responding to without really understanding what it is?

Yeah, I just think different folks have different tastes. I'm not a massive fan of Keats myself (I think he's brilliant and especially love Grecian Urn and Nightingale--and love reading his letters! but my heart is really with modern poetry and its evolution) and I love Keats' influence on Fitz's work. For me, I see their connection thematically as writers who sort of idealize (people, objects, etc) and then lament/rue the continual gnawing or infringement or impact of reality upon those idealizations.

_________________
"I'm sorry! I'm Canadian!"


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5399 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159, 160 ... 216  Next

All times are UTC - 6 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group
Template made by DEVPPL/ThatBigForum and fancied up by What Cheer